(514) 836 4571



Adaptability Factor
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 December 2012 16:22

Points for adaptability – Skilled workers and professionals

Adaptability (Maximum 10 points)

You may be awarded selection points if you can show that you or your dependants can adapt to living in Canada.

Adaptability Maximum 10 points

Spouse or common-law partner’s level of education

  • Secondary school (high school) diploma or less: 0 points
  • A one-year diploma, trade certificate, apprenticeship or university degree, and at least 12 years of full-time or full-time equivalent studies: 3 points
  • A two or three-year diploma, trade certificate, apprenticeship or university degree, and at least 14 years of full-time or full-time equivalent studies: 4 points
  • A master’s degree or PhD and at least 17 years of full-time or full-time equivalent studies: 5 points
3–5
Previous work in Canada
You, or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner, have completed a minimum of one year of full-time work in Canada on a valid work permit.
5
Previous study in Canada
You, or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner, have completed a program of full-time study of at least two years’ duration at a post-secondary institution in Canada. You must have done this after you were 17 years old and with a valid study permit.

There is no need to have obtained a degree or diploma for these two years of study to earn these points.
5
Arranged Employment in Canada
You can claim five additional points if you have arranged employment as described in the Arranged Employment selection factor.
5
Relatives in Canada
You, or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner, have a relative (parent, grandparent, child, grandchild, child of a parent, sibling, child of a grandparent, aunt or uncle, or grandchild of a parent, niece or nephew) who is residing in Canada and is a Canadian citizen or permanent resident.
5

You can only count points from each category once. You can claim points from a category either for you, or for your spouse or common-law partner, but not for both.

Last Updated on Thursday, 20 December 2012 14:31