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  • Ontario graduates flip the switch on world's most energy efficient light bulb

    Three graduates from the University of Toronto (U of T) in Ontario, Canada are ready to hit the market with the NanoLight – a 12-watt lightbulb that generates over 1600 lumens, equivalent to a 100 watt incandescent light bulb. The innovative design uses small LEDs on a folded circuit-board to produce a cool-to-touch, environmentally-friendly light bulb that turns on instantly and plugs in to a regular light fixture.

    NanoLight's innovative breakthrough has resulted in a flurry of investments on the crowd-funding website, KickStarter, since its launch on January 7, 2013. The project had raised more than $140,000 with more than 3,000 investors at time of publication—surpassing their initial goal of raising $20,000 by March 8, 2013. Shipments of the Nanolight lightbulbs are set to begin in May.

    Gimmy Chu, Tom Rodinger and Christian Yan
    Gimmy Chu, Tom Rodinger and Christian Yan

    With a vision to create a better world through conservation and preservation of the planet, Tom Rodinger, Gimmy Chu and Christian Yan met at U of T while developing a vehicle with the university's solar car project. Rodinger was a senior member of the team, completing his PhD, while Chu and Yan were third-year Electrical and Computer Engineering students looking for ways to contribute their skills to different projects and start-ups around campus.

    "For Gimmy and myself, U of T was a good atmosphere for entrepreneurship-- people in our class, our professors, it's a really dynamic place with different cultural backgrounds and people who are really smart," said Yan. "U of T provided a great platform for everyone to incorporate business together with engineering."

    NanoLight bulbs
    NanoLight bulbs

    Ontario is a North American hub for Research and Development (R&D). More than 100,000 business and university-based researchers, their assistants and support staff, spend almost $13.4 billion every year working on issues ranging from life-saving vaccines to nano-materials and next-generation wireless devices.

    Home to 18 of Canada's top research universities including number one ranked U of T, Ontario has globally recognized strengths in a range of sectors, including health, manufacturing, digital media and clean tech. Leveraging that high-value resource can generate competitive advantages for Ontario companies in the global marketplace.

    NanoLight prototypes
    NanoLight prototypes

    Ontario's innovation strategy is, in turn, a component of a broader economic plan to create an ecosystem in the province that helps knowledge-based industries compete globally. Ontario has made massive investments in post-secondary education to create a skilled, educated talent pool. The R&D tax incentives in the province are among the most generous in the G7. Business operating costs are among the lowest in leading industrialized nations, particularly in digital media, financial services, biotech and advanced manufacturing.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Doing R&D in Ontario makes good financial sense. In addition to Canada's federal R&D tax program – one of the most generous in the world – Ontario offers a number of tax incentives to reduce the cost of innovation. Ontario also invests millions of dollars each year to support research and commercialization at its universities, colleges, hospitals and research institutions.

    • Each year, more than $13.9 billion is spent on R&D in Ontario by industry, governments, hospitals, academic and research institutions, and private non-profit organizations.

    • Ontario is home to Canada's top research talent, with more than 100,000 researchers working on issues ranging from life-saving vaccines to nano-materials and climate change mitigation.

    LEARN MORE [requires Adobe Acrobat Reader®]



  • A tale of two (intelligent) cities in Ontario, Canada

    Two cities in Ontario, Canada have been named to the Top 7 Intelligent Communities of the Year.

    Toronto and Stratford are on this prestigious global list produced by the New York-based Intelligent Community Forum (ICF). The Intelligent Community of the Year is named in June.

    The appearance of two cities from the same region (southwestern Ontario) on the Top 7 is "rare," according to ICF co-founder Lou Zacharilla.

    The Top 7 is chosen from an initial group of 21 communities, the Smart 21, nominees which showed best how they've measured against the ICF's five Intelligent Community Indicators: broadband connectivity, knowledge workforce, innovation, digital inclusion and marketing and advocacy. Nominees are also gauged on an annual theme. This year the theme is innovation and employment.

    ICF Top7 Intelligent Communities of 2013 ICF Top7 Intelligent Communities of 2013 Video
    Video courtesy Intelligent Community Forum (ICF)

    Toronto and Stratford are part of a group that Zacharillo describes as "seasoned veterans. Each has been working on the five criteria at varying paces for at least seven years. They're also places that are not trying to 'win an award,' so much as learning how to build a community."

    In its evaluation of Toronto's submission, the ICF highlighted one effort in particular: the revitalization of the city's waterfront, which ICF describes as "North America's largest urban renewal project."

    In 2001, the city of Toronto, the province of Ontario and the Canadian government co-created a corporation, Waterfront Toronto, with each level of government providing $500 million in seed funding. Waterfront Toronto is stewarding the revitalization of roughly 2,000 acres of land.

    "It's increasing Toronto's competitiveness globally," says Ed Chalupka, Director, Government Relations at Waterfront Toronto.

    The province, as principal owner of the West Don Lands, dedicated part of the 80-acre site for use as the Athletes' Village during the 2015 Pan/Parapan American Games in Toronto.

    "So out of this you're actually getting a planned community," says Chalupka.

    As former industrial lands, located at the original mouth of the Don River, the West Don Lands are being reclaimed and flood-protected.

    This is part of an overall effort that will see 40,000 new residential housing units, 1 million square meters of commercial space and 300 hectares of parkland built along Toronto's waterfront.

    A 1 Gbps fibre network will be installed to serve residents, commercial operations, a new elementary school and two child-care centres.

    For its part, Stratford, a city of 32,000, has built on its legacy as home to, among other things, the Stratford Festival. After 60 years in operation, the festival is the city's biggest employer and generates $140 million in economic activity, offers Stratford's mayor Dan Mathieson.

    "So I think it's ingrained in our local mindset that creativity and vision are valuable, and really the only path to securing a prosperous future," he says.

    In 1997, the city started a unique effort involving community consultation and a strategic plan to reposition itself. "By raising our sights, investing in infrastructure and embracing technology, we positioned ourselves for the digital economy," says Mayor Mathieson.

    The growth from this vision is evident today and includes the University of Waterloo's new $45-million Stratford Campus, where two degree programs concentrating on digital media and business creation are delivered. "The province has been integral to faciliting this," says the mayor.

    Ontario cities are among the safest most liveable in the world. Annual surveys and rankings by the Economist Intelligence Unit, fDi Intelligence, the Intelligent Community Forum, Mercer and other leading organizations consistently give Ontario cities top marks for factors like quality of life, cost of living and innovation.

    Business leaders worldwide invest in Ontario because of the province's combination of talent, cost-efficiencies, environment of innovation and quality of life.

    QUICK FACTS

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  • Ontario, Canada puts hybrid vehicle production into high gear with a new investment toward production at Toyota plant

    Ontario, Canada is moving forward on its plan to become a world leader in clean energy and manufacturing, with a new investment in energy-efficient vehicles.

    The Ontario government today announced an investment of almost $16.9 million toward hybrid vehicle production at the Toyota plant in Cambridge, Ontario. The investment will allow the plant to produce the Lexus RX450h hybrid.

    Ontario is providing the funding through its Strategic Jobs and Investment Fund. The Government of Canada is also contributing $16.9 million to the project. The investment will help sustain 7,000 jobs at Toyota and thousands more at parts companies across the province.

    Brad Duguid, Ontario's Minister of Economic Development and Innovation, says, "Toyota is an essential part of Ontario's auto industry, and a big reason why the province continues to be a leader in North America for vehicle assembly. The Ontario government is delighted to further strengthen our partnership with Toyota and we thank the company for its ongoing confidence in Ontario and its auto workers."

    Toyota will put $125 million toward the new assembly line. The project will lead to the first Lexus hybrid produced outside of Japan – testament of Ontario's commitment to innovation in clean technology.

    Ontario's renowned track record of auto innovation is founded on a sophisticated R&D infrastructure focused on green innovation, generous R&D tax credits, outstanding workers with skills for the 21st century and unparalleled market access.

    Manufacturers doing research in Ontario have access to thousands of world-leading scientists at 30 auto-focused public research facilities. Their research involves re-thinking virtually every aspect of vehicle design and assembly.

    Government incentives can cut costs substantially for R&D projects aimed at designing and building more fuel-efficient vehicles. Federal and provincial programs through which industry can access millions of dollars in research money include: the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the Ontario and Canada Research Chairs.

    QUICK FACTS

    • With this investment, Toyota's Cambridge plant will produce an additional 26,000 Lexus vehicles, 15,000 of them hybrids.

    • Ontario produces more cars than any other place in North America.

    • The auto industry supports nearly 485,000 jobs across Ontario.

    LEARN MORE



  • Ontario leads the way in lightweight composite materials processing, testing and research with launch of new Fraunhofer Project Centre

    A new engine for growth and innovation in manufacturing has been built in Ontario, Canada.

    The Fraunhofer Project Centre for Composites Research (FPC) is a 12,000 square-foot site located in Western University's Advanced Manufacturing Park near London, Ontario.

    The Centre will provide platform technology for real-time, industrial part development using – as well as developing – composite materials and manufacturing processes. The focus of the Centre is advanced manufacturing, which means highly precise in-line quality controlled manufacturing of high-performance composites in a suitable scale.

    The launch represents an unprecedented partnership bringing together a Canadian university, a German industry and three levels of Canadian government. The Project Centre will also make London, Ontario the leading site for advanced composite materials research and testing at the manufacturing scale in North America.

    Video courtesy of Western University
    Video courtesy of Western University

    FPC researchers will develop and test lightweight composites, using industrial standards and equipment, for client companies, starting with the automotive sector. The Centre already has big clients in Ford, Chrysler and General Motors.

    "London is located along the 401/402 highway corridor that links the Michigan and Ontario auto sectors," explains Andy Hrymak, FPC deputy director and dean of engineering at Western University. "It's ideally placed between the main hubs of innovation in Detroit and the [Greater Toronto Area]."

    For an increasing number of advanced manufacturers – leading companies from Asia, Europe and the U.S. – Ontario is a destination of choice because it's a manufacturing powerhouse, with the people, the resources and the location that are essential for success in today’s competitive economy.

    "This (centre) will support the competitiveness and increase the productivity of Canada to respond to the lightweight challenges facing North America’s automotive transportation industries, as well as the development of innovative products for the renewable energy and construction material industries," said Frank Henning, Fraunhofer deputy institute director.

    Material and process research will be carried out in processing technologies such as Direct – Sheet Moulding Compounds (D-SMC), Long Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics (LFT) and High Pressure Resin Transfer Moulding (HP RTM). The aim is the accelerated adoption of these high volume composite technologies in industrial sectors such as the automotive and other transportation, machines and equipment supply, renewable energy, construction materials and aviation.

    Equipped with this full industrial scale processing equipment and as a part of The University of Western Ontario, the FPC offers collaboration from bilateral private sector projects up to multilateral public funded research projects.

    The FPC’s service portfolio contains:

    • Research in the fields materials, simulation, design
    • Optimizing of existing processes and materials
    • Development of new processes and materials as well as transition of lab scale basic research results into industrial applications
    • Part, process, material and tooling innovations
    • Competence along the whole value chain from product engineering up to manufacturing of demonstrator parts

    The Fraunhofer Project Centre is further evidence of Ontario’s global leadership in advanced manufacturing.

    Lightweight composites are used increasingly in automotive underbodies, body panels, tailgates, doors and seats in an effort to make cars lighter and to improve overall fuel economy.

    "Our next area will be sustainable building materials – long life, superior mechanical to weight performance and energy conserving," offers Hrymak.

    The FPC will also develop and test lightweight composites for the production of solar and wind energy technologies.

    The city of London provided $10 million in funding, the first of three levels of government to invest in the FPC.

    Researchers at the Fraunhofer Project Centre
    Researchers at the Fraunhofer Project Centre. Photo courtesy of Western University.

    Canada's federal government contributed $13.7 million through its Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario).

    Through its Ontario Research Fund, the province made an initial $2 million investment in the FPC. According to Western University, the value of this investment has grown to more than $7 million as the initial investment attracted financial support from industry.

    There's great momentum heading into 2013, when the initial phase of the FPC's equipment commission and installation will be completed, explains Western's Andy Hrymak.

    The centre has already purchased the key pieces of equipment such as the Dieffenbacher Material Press (produced by Dieffenbacher North America Inc., located in Windsor, Ontario).

    Along with strengthening infrastructure and increased capacity, the FPC represents opportunities for students, who will benefit from working with Fraunhofer experts in the state-of-the-art facility.

    "It creates a unique platform for the training of the next generation of engineers," said Fraunhofer's Dr. Henning, who will act as the FPC's managing director, at its recent official opening. That means that Ontario’s pool of expertise in developing innovative lightweight materials will grow over time.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Through the Ontario Research Fund (ORF), the province has committed $730 million over four years to provide talented researchers with the support they need to undertake cutting-edge research.

    • In Ontario, thousands of researchers work at 30 publicly funded research facilities, including the Centre for Advanced Materials and Manufacturing (CAM), the Waterloo Centre for Automotive Research (WatCAR) and the McMaster Manufacturing Research Institute (MMRI).

    • More than 350 aerospace firms in Ontario are developing lighter, greener, stronger, more efficient next generation products using advanced polymers, bio-composites and super conductive materials.

    LEARN MORE



  • Ontario, Canada Getting Out of Coal-fired Generation<BR>Province to Close Last of Southern Ontario Coal Plants this Year

    Ontario, Canada's most populous province, will shut down the last of its coal plants in southern Ontario by the end of 2013, a year ahead of schedule. This will lead to a significant reduction in harmful emissions, cleaner air and a healthier environment for Ontario's families and its neighbours.

    The early closure of Ontario's two largest coal-fired electricity plants, Nanticoke and Lambton, comes as a result of the province's improved, smarter electricity grid, increased efficiency, strong conservation efforts and diversified supply of clean energy. Coal-fired electricity emits high levels of pollutants that affect human health and the environment.

    Coal Plant Closing

    Clean energy and a modern electricity system have created tens of thousands of jobs and contribute to making Ontario one of the most liveable jurisdictions in North America, a hub of innovation and an attractive place to work and invest.

    According to The fDi Report 2012 - Global Greenfield Investment Trends, released by the Financial Times' fDi Intelligence think-tank, "Ontario was the world's leading region for renewable energy projects in 2011." The renewable sector energy alone saw US$12 billion in capital investment that year.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Since 2003, Ontario has cut its use of coal by nearly 90 per cent.

    • Ontario currently uses less coal-fired generation in its energy mix than any G8 nation.

    • In 2014, Ontario's use of coal is expected to be less than 1 per cent of total electricity generation, down from 25 per cent in 2003.

    • The province will have shut down 17 of 19 coal units by the end of 2013. By the end of 2014, Ontario will be one of the first places in the world to eliminate coal as a source of electricity production.

    • Today, more than 80 per cent of the power generated in Ontario comes from clean energy sources such as water, nuclear and renewables.

    • Ontario's elimination of coal-fired electricity is equivalent of taking up to 7 million cars off the road.

    • Ontario's greenhouse gas emissions from the electricity sector will decrease dramatically as a result of becoming coal-free, from a high of 41.4 megatonnes in 2000 to only five megatonnes post-2020.

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  • Punching above its weight: Ontario dominates science and technology in Canada

    The province of Ontario is by far Canada's leading region for incubating high-tech industries, according to a new report from the Council of Canadian Academies. The province is also a world leader in training scientists from other countries and linking with tech businesses around the world.

    "Ontario can make the case for the strength of science and technology enterprise," says Eliot Phillipson, chair of the committee, which wrote the State of Science and Technology in Canada report. Dr. Phillipson is also a professor emeritus of medical science at the University of Toronto.

    The study shows that Ontario, with a third of Canada's population, produces half of the country's technology output – and nearly half of its scientific research papers.

    Other key findings of the report include:

    • Ontario accounts for almost half of all Canadian R&D expenditures.
    • Ontario is the main hub of Canada's collaboration network.
    • Ontario is the leading province for Canada's total intellectual property ownership.
    • Ontario produces 46 per cent of Canada's bibliometric output (the analysis of peer-reviewed scientific papers).

    The practical significance of the findings should be of particular interest to international investors. In sum, the findings define a bedrock of world-class excellence in technology and the sciences. For example, Canada has the third largest video game industry in the world, after the United States and Japan. Ontario alone possesses dozens of game developers, and trains video programmers in colleges from Toronto to Ottawa to Sault Ste Marie.

    Dr. Phillipson points out that Ontario is especially strong in two of the six areas of research where Canada excelled in a recent international study: clinical medicine, and information and communication technologies, or ICT (the others are psychology and cognitive sciences, physics and astronomy, visual arts and historical studies).

    In both clinical medicine and ICT, Ontario has developed "tech clusters" where strong research programs fertilize a profusion of small technology companies. Some of these grow into large companies, which support increased university research, which in turn lures major foreign investors attracted by the opportunity to set up local affiliates.

    Perhaps the most well-known and colourful "cluster story" is the tale of an immigrant family from Turkey whose son studied electrical engineering at Ontario's University of Waterloo. That son, Mike Lazaridis, dropped out in order to bid on a research project. He subsequently levered that contract into the multibillion dollar Research in Motion, the company that created the iconic Blackberry mobile phone.

    Within a year of launching the Blackberry, RIM ploughed much of the profit back into the university, setting up the now-world-famous Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, soon followed by the Institute for Quantum Computing. Within a short time Microsoft, Oracle, Google and many other offshore giants set up development offices in Waterloo and its sister city of Kitchener. Kitchener-Waterloo, with a modest population of just over 300,000, is now one of the world's premiere ICT clusters.

    While the story of Kitchener-Waterloo is a tale of serendipity, Toronto's MaRS Discovery District is a carefully planned initiative of the Ontario government. A cluster which promotes research in clinical medicine, it opened in 2005 in the wing of the Toronto General Hospital where insulin was discovered a half-century ago. The idea was to join three large downtown teaching hospitals – which Dr. Phillipson calls "the largest collection of medical and health sciences complexes in the world" – with the renowned school of medicine at the nearby University of Toronto, where stem cells were discovered. Focussing on biotechnology research and business spinoffs, MaRS has matured into a "cluster" with dozens of startups like Receptor Therapeutics, and major financial support from companies like Glaxo Smith Kline.

    "It's no surprise that clinical medicine is one of the things we're good at," says Robert Luke, assistant vice president of research and innovation for George Brown College in Toronto.

    Luke served on the Council of Canadian Academies panel which produced the State of Science and Technology report and endorses its description of Ontario as “the main hub of Canada's collaboration network” and the leading province for intellectual property ownership.

    For Professor Luke a key element in the "hub" is polytechnic schools such as George Brown, which do advanced industrial research and train technicians to a high standard. Ontario has five out of nine of Canada's polytechnics, and their mission is to produce useful products. The bottom line, he says, is "what's the customer going to think about it?"

    For Eliot Phillipson, another key indicator of world-class success in science is a country's ability to attract talent from abroad. Ontario's two tech clusters, which he does not hesitate to compare with "Silicon Valley, the Boston area and North Carolina", spark extensive overseas collaboration.

    "Technology transfer is a social process based on people interacting," says Phillipson, noting that scientists who come from abroad to work in Canada's tech clusters learn English and stay in touch. This helps account for the report's surprising finding that four of the six top countries purchasing Canadian patents are the rising powerhouses of China, Japan, Korea and Brazil.

    "It's a measure of respect for Canadian science."

    QUICK FACTS

    • Doing R&D in Ontario makes good financial sense. In addition to Canada's federal R&D tax program – one of the most generous in the world – Ontario offers a number of tax incentives to reduce the cost of innovation. Ontario also invests millions of dollars each year to support research and commercialization at its universities, colleges, hospitals and research institutions.

    • Each year, more than $13.9 billion is spent on R&D in Ontario by industry, governments, hospitals, academic and research institutions, and private non-profit organizations.

    • Ontario is home to Canada's top research talent, with more than 100,000 researchers working on issues ranging from life-saving vaccines to nano-materials and climate change mitigation.

    • R&D in Ontario is driven by businesses, governments, hospitals, private non-profits, universities and colleges and research institutions.

    LEARN MORE



  • Hydrogenics scores another win with $92-million sale of hydrogen generators and fuel cell systems

    An Ontario, Canada company recognized as a global leader in hydrogen power technology has won a $92-million contract to supply propulsion system equipment to a leading original equipment manufacturer.

    Hydrogenics Corporation, a Mississauga company with 130 employees in Canada, Belgium and Germany, recently sealed the three-year deal, which includes the sale of integrated fuel cell power systems, power electronic converters, associated hardware and propulsion system software.

    The contract – the largest in Hydrogenics' history – represents yet another innovation success story in Ontario. It also underlines Ontario's leadership in the alternative energy sector, confirmed recently by an fDI Intelligence think-tank report that showed Ontario had the highest number of renewable energy projects in North America in 2011.

    Hydrogenics makes generators and fuel cell systems that produce electricity by combining hydrogen and oxygen – a process that creates no emissions except pure water. The company's global leadership in hydrogen power technology was recognized this year by the International Association for Hydrogen Energy, which awarded Hydrogenics its prestigious Sir William Grove Award.

    Daryl Wilson, CEO of Hydrogenics, says the company's technology is currently in use across various industries globally, including aerospace, telecommunications, mass transit, manufacturing and large-scale utilities.

    Hydrogenics fuel cells are powering U.S. Air Force utility vehicles in Georgia, public transit buses in Texas, garbage collection trucks in Berlin, Germany, and street sweepers in Basel, Switzerland. The company's generators are also supplying renewable hydrogen energy to cars and buses through fuelling stations in Germany, Norway and Switzerland.

    “Hydrogenics is leading the world in realizing the value of hydrogen technology for energy storage and clean energy systems,” says Wilson. “We are doing the important work supporting a power shift in global energy systems to clean, sustainable, renewable alternatives."

    Hydrogenics is also part of an international consortium that recently launched a $31-million R&D and demonstration project. Funded in part by the European Commission, the project will combine hydrogen systems with advanced technologies for monitoring and controlling smart grids to balance power supply and demand in markets where there is high penetration of renewable energy sources.

    Wilson says Ontario's environment of innovation and wealth of R&D talent have made it easier for Hydrogenics to develop and advance its technologies. Since it launched in 1995, Hydrogenics has collaborated on many occasions with engineers and researchers at leading Ontario universities, including the University of Toronto, University of Waterloo, and Queen's University.

    Hydrogenics also has a large contingent of Ontario talent, many of whom will be providing the expertise needed to fulfill the company's $92-million contract.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Each year, more than $13.3 billion in spent on research and development in Ontario, which is home to more than 45 per cent of Canada's R&D personnel.

    • Ontario has the second highest concentration of hydrogen and fuel cell facilities in Canada.

    • Canada's hydrogen and fuel cell industry generated revenues of $211 million in 2011 – an increase of almost 120 per cent from 2001.

    • Canada exports approximately 90% of its hydrogen and fuel cell technology.

    • The global hydrogen and fuel cell market is expected to grow to $785 million in 2012.

    LEARN MORE



  • Canada ranked the global leader in tax competitiveness among developed countries

    In a recent KPMG study on international corporate tax competitiveness, Canada tops all developed countries and ranks second overall (after India) among the 14 major countries compared.

    The study, KPMG's Competitive Alternatives 2012 - Special Report: Focus on Tax, affirms other recent findings on Canada’s global tax and cost competitiveness. According to KPMG's Competitive Alternatives 2012 study of international business costs, Canada's overall business costs are lower than in the U.S., France, Italy, Germany, Australia or Japan. In the IMD World Competitiveness Scoreboard 2012, Canada placed second among G7 countries and sixth overall, out of 59 countries.

    The KPMG study on taxes also found that Canada excelled in specific business sectors. For example, in the digital sector, Canada comes in first out of the 14 countries compared.

    Ontario’s role in Canada’s leadership ranking

    According to Elio Luongo, Canadian managing partner, tax, KPMG in Canada, who led the study, Ontario plays an important role in supporting Canada's leadership position. Case in point: the study ranks Toronto, Ontario in the top spot among 55 cities studied in the digital sector; and Windsor, Ontario ranks second out of the 16 Canadian cities considered in the sector.

    "The Ontario Interactive Digital Media Tax Credit has a significant impact on the results for Toronto in the digital media sector, and therefore also contributes to Toronto’s overall positive ranking," Mr. Luongo explained.

    The Ontario Interactive Digital Media Tax Credit (OIDMTC) is a refundable tax credit based on eligible Ontario labour expenditures and eligible marketing and distribution expenses claimed by a qualifying corporation with respect to interactive digital media products.

    The program refunds 40 per cent of the costs of labour, marketing and distribution for games created in-house in Ontario. For companies that develop games under a fee-for-service arrangement the tax credit is 35 per cent. In either case, there is no per project or annual corporate limit on the amount that can be claimed.

    Mr. Luongo has high praise for Ontario.

    “Both Ontario and Canada continue to offer a very competitive tax structure, which is crucial to attracting inbound investment, spurring innovation, and creating skilled jobs that support our families and communities in the province and across the country."

    Results for the KPMG study on the digital sector are based on an analysis of two model business operations: a software development firm and a video game production studio.

    For the type of digital media operations examined by KPMG, Ontario’s labour credit of 35 per cent ranks second only to Nova Scotia (41.25 per cent for its capital and biggest city, Halifax), pointed out Mr. Luongo. But, he continued, higher tax costs in other areas cause Halifax to rank behind Toronto and Windsor, Ontario for this sector.

    Ontario’s competitive corporate income tax rate (CIT) helps make the province a hub for global business. Ontario's combined federal-provincial 26.5 per cent CIT is lower than the average of G8 and G20 countries and lower than the average federal-state CIT rate in the United States.

    Ontario and federal CIT reductions, along with the introduction of a harmonized sales tax and elimination of the capital tax, lowered Ontario’s marginal effective tax rate (METR) on new business investment from 33.7% in 2009 to 18.7% in 2010. Ontario’s METR is lower than those of the U.S. and OECD countries and is projected to further decrease to 16.3% by 2013.

    Ontario’s tax programs provide a big boost for business, helping them thrive and driving investments in innovation. Ontario has a number of targeted tax incentives, such as the Film and Television Tax Credit, and the Production Services Tax Credit, that can help emerging industries expand.

    Ontario also offers a range of credits and incentives for innovation and research, including the Ontario Research and Development Tax Credit, the Ontario Innovation Demonstration Fund, the Ontario Emerging Technologies Fund, and the Ontario Venture Capital Fund.

    QUICK FACTS

    • The Total Tax Index (TTI) is the "primary measure" KPMG uses in its tax study. The study defines TTI as follows: "Total tax costs are compared between countries and cities using a Total Tax Index (TTI) for each location. The TTI is a measure of the total tax paid by corporations in a particular location, expressed as a percentage of total taxes paid by corporations in the U.S. Thus, the United States has a TTI of 100.00, which represents the benchmark against the other countries and cities are compared."

    • Business costs for digital medial companies – from start-up through the first ten years – are lower in Canada than in any G7 country according to KPMG's 2012 Competitive Alternatives report. And they continue to fall as we cut business taxes substantially.

    • Government incentives can substantially cut R&D, labour, marketing and distribution costs for game developers and producers. We also make it easy for companies to relocate key personnel for temporary work terms – and spouses can get work permits.

    LEARN MORE



  • State-of-the-art Mike & Ophelia Lazaridis Quantum-Nano Centre opens in Ontario, Canada

    Recently, businessman Mike Lazaridis encouraged those present at the opening ceremony of the Mike & Ophelia Lazaridis Quantum-Nano Centre (QNC) to boldly go where no one has gone before.

    Referencing the well-known Star Trek TV series seemed altogether fitting as the facility will inspire exploration and enable cutting-edge research. But researchers won’t need to go to a galaxy far, far away to access the facility. The Quantum-Nano Centre is located conveniently in Ontario, Canada, on the main campus of the University of Waterloo.

    The Mike & Ophelia Lazaridis Quantum-Nano Centre. Photo by Maris Mezulis

    The Centre will bring together the two disciplines of quantum computing and nanotechnology under one roof, creating a facility that is the first of its kind in the world. Both disciplines involve the study of matter on a minute scale.

    Advanced research in such fields as quantum computing, theoretical physics and nanotechnology has historically led to some of the greatest advances in our fundamental understanding of the universe and matter, including advances in materials sciences. These advances hold the promise of transforming virtually every high-tech industry from advanced manufacturing to life sciences, to information technology. Unlocking and harnessing its potential requires four essential elements:

    1. Great and ambitious science.
    2. World-class research infrastructure.
    3. Skilled workers.
    4. And supportive government.

    Investors who choose Ontario have access to all of that – in a positive climate that helps businesses grow and succeed.

    The Mike & Ophelia Lazaridis Quantum-Nano Centre. Photo by Tom Arban

    “Breakthrough science is advancing at a dizzying speed today, with quantum physics at atomic and sub-atomic scale,” said Lazaridis, founder of QNC and co-founder of Research in Motion, makers of the now ubiquitous BlackBerry smartphone. “Simultaneously, rapid movement is happening in nanotechnology, where fabrication of materials, devices and systems 100 nanometres or smaller is being explored. This critical nexus of quantum computing and nanotechnology brings the world closer to the cusp of previously unimagined solutions and insights.”

    The state-of-the-art $160-million centre was made possible by a $100-million donation from Lazaridis, as well as funding from the federal and Ontario provincial governments. Ontario, a centre for advanced scientific research and innovation, is a priority destination for entrepreneurs and industries who want to create world-class research facilities.

    The 26,010-square-metre, five-storey Quantum-Nano Centre will become home to the Institute for Quantum Computing, the Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology and the university’s undergraduate program in nanotechnology engineering. The state-of-the-art facility was designed to attract world-class talent.

    The Quantum Nano-Centre is, in fact, the latest in a number of major investments in research centres that are driving innovation.

    In 2011, the new Stephen Hawking Centre opened at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, and the MaRS Discovery District (a convergence centre that accelerates innovation and the commercialization of new discoveries) started a major phase of expansion aimed at more than doubling its size in Toronto.

    Each discipline will occupy its own building, joined by a six-storey central atrium with informal gathering space. Lounges, offices and meeting rooms are positioned around the edge of the atrium to foster collaboration and the exchange of ideas between scientists. White boards cover many of the walls to accommodate unexpected flashes of insight.

    The Mike & Ophelia Lazardis Quantum-Nano Centre. Photo by Maris Mezulis

    Equipped with controls for vibration, temperature fluctuation and electromagnetic radiation, the Quantum-Nano Centre was designed to meet strict scientific standards.

    One of the signature features of the facility is a clean room area that was created to keep out particles of air and skin so researchers can manipulate atoms one by one and make very precise materials. The clean room contains less than 100 particles, whereas a standard room contains about two billion particles.

    The QNC also has on-site fabrication facilities that will give scientists and students the tools to create quantum nanodevices. Because the fabrication can be done on-site, it will allow for faster development and revision than is possible in other research facilities.

    With this unique facility, a new frontier of research and innovation is about to begin in Ontario.

    Quick Facts
    Mike & Ophelia Lazaridis Quantum-Nano Centre

    • The Quantum-Nano Centre will accommodate a total of 400 academics in quantum computing and nanotechnology.

    • A hexagonal honeycomb lattice of structural steel distinguishes the exterior of the building; the pattern was inspired by the stable hexagonal carbon structure of the nanotube.
    Canada’s Technology Triangle Inc.
    • Canada’s Technology Triangle (Waterloo Region; also abbreviated “CTT”) derived its name from the longstanding reputation the region has for innovation, established by resident businesses. Canada’s Technology Triangle came to be used in the 1980s and the global recognition of its high technology cluster in the 1990s validated the name.

    • Companies in the region include RIM (BlackBerry), OpenText, DALSA, COM DEV, Christie (digital projection) and Toyota’s first, outside-Japan, luxury class car production.

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  • Wall Street Journal profiles tech start-up magnet Waterloo, Ontario

    A recent Wall Street Journal article on Waterloo, Ontario captures perfectly what many leading tech firms have already discovered: Waterloo has become "a magnet for technology start-ups, incubators, accelerators and young inventors."

    Tech leaders and entrepreneurs who have chosen to do business in Waterloo have also discovered the region's wealth of compelling business advantages.

    The Wall Street Journal states that, "Waterloo boasted 302 new technology-focused start-ups last year, according to Communitech, a local nonprofit that supports entrepreneurs. That dwarfs the 85 companies that New York think tank Urban Futures figures opened their doors in the Big Apple last year."

    Waterloo lies at the heart of one of North America's pre-eminent technology clusters. A city of 100,000 people, it is the home base for Research In Motion, Open Text and dozens of other Canadian industry leaders, as well as operations of such companies as Google, IBM, McAfee and other multinationals. What distinguishes Waterloo from other technology centres is a culture that combines collaborative, small-town networks with an entrepreneurial global perspective.

    A key driver of this culture is the local presence of a college, three universities and more than 150 think tanks such as the Perimeter Institute where renowned physicist Stephen Hawking is a Distinguished Research Chair. The University of Waterloo, one of Canada's leading research universities, is the largest of these schools with more than 1,000 faculty members and 27,000 undergraduates. It attracts some 4,300 international students each year from 90 countries. The university is renowned for its engineering programs, particularly in computer and software engineering. From its inception in the mid-1950s, the University of Waterloo deliberately fostered both close connections with the business community and an entrepreneurial culture among its faculty and its students.

    The synergies of world-class engineering and technology programs, a highly skilled workforce and other competitive business advantages have made the Waterloo region a go-to destination for start-ups and entrepreneurs.

    Ontario is where leading tech entrepreneurs with big ideas go to make their ideas a reality. Read the Wall Street Journal article (registration required). To find out more about Waterloo, Ontario's wealth of business advantages, see the Learn More links below.

    QUICK FACTS:

    • Ontario's ICT industry is recognized globally for its expertise in every sector, including software and systems, wireless and telecommunications, mobile applications, microelectronics, photonics, digital media and green IT.

    • Our diversified talent pool of more than 300,000 skilled workers – close to 60 per cent with a post-secondary education – working with world leading infrastructure and communications networks means invention and commercialization come easy in Ontario.

    • Ontario has among the best R&D tax credits of the G7 countries. More costs qualify for R&D tax credits in Ontario than in the U.S. Ontario and federal tax credits can cut the after-tax cost of a $100 R&D expenditure to about $57 - $39.

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  • China "Get's More" from Bombardier Ontario built Q400

    Ontario's innovative aerospace industry is well-established. It includes world leaders with global product mandates, top-of-the-line suppliers and a broad range of advanced manufacturing support services.

    Case in point: Bombardier. Currently on the fifth leg of its "Get More" world tour, Bombardier Aerospace's Q400 Next Generation airliner landed in Beijing, China in spring 2012. Built at Bombardier's Toronto, Ontario facility, this turboprop airliner is the most recent development in the evolution of the Q400 aircraft.

    Andy Solem, Vice President, Sales, China and North Asia, Bombardier Commercial Aircraft, says, "The Q400 NextGen aircraft's fuel efficiency, operational flexibility, low operating cost, reduced environmental impact and passenger-pleasing interior make it an outstanding solution for local airlines and leasing companies looking at growing hubs and connections between major regional and industrial cities as well as tourist destinations."

    "Bombardier predicts that over the next 20 years, China's fleet of commercial aircraft will grow as it becomes the world's second largest market for new aircraft deliveries, following closely behind the United States," says Solem. "The overall fleet of 20- to 149-seat aircraft in China is forecasted to grow by 300 per cent over the next 20 years."

    Bombardier forecasts a growth in the 20- to 149-seat segment that will reach 2,540 units in China in the next 20 years, with a strong demand in the 100- to 149-seat segment. It is working closely with local airlines, supplier and stakeholders to assist in the fleet and infrastructure expansion.

    Companies like Bombardier, Pratt & Whitney Canada, Honeywell Aerospace, Goodrich Landing Gear, Messier-Bugatti-Dowty, Eurocopter Canada, COM DEV and Magellan Aerospace Corporation thrive in Ontario. They are helping to transform mobility worldwide by answering the call for more efficient, sustainable and enjoyable transportation everywhere. Ontario, Canada's aerospace companies are developing lighter, stronger, more efficient next-generation products using advanced polymers, bio-composites and super conductive materials.

    Ontario helps aerospace companies succeed in global markets by offering an exceptional workforce, top-ranked R&D, and competitive business costs.

    Canada was ranked second as the most cost sensitive location for aerospace aircrafts part manufacturing in KPMG's influential Competitive Alternatives report 2012.

    QUICK FACTS

    • The Canadian government offers a range of aerospace R&D support programs through the Institute for Aerospace Research, the Canadian space agency, strategic Aerospace and Defensive Initiative, the Industrial Research Assistance program and the National Research Council.

    • Innovation is part of the reason why more than 100 aerospace programs around the world – including the Airbus A380, Boeing 787 and the Joint Strike Fighter – incorporate components made-in-Ontario by companies like Goodrich Landing Gear, Messier-Bugatti-Dowty, Honeywell, Pratt & Whitney Canada and Magellan Aerospace.

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  • Toyota to increase Lexus RX production capacity in Ontario, Canada

    Toyota Canada is investing US$100 million to increase Lexus ‘RX’ production capacity at its Ontario, Canada plant located in Cambridge.

    The Lexus RX hybrids will be made in Cambridge, increasing Toyota’s production capacity in Canada to 500,000 units. The Lexus RX capacity will increase by 30,000 vehicles to 104,000 units, including 15,000 RX450h vehicles – the hybrid electric version of the popular Lexus.

    The expanded Lexus production is set for early 2014. "This is a big and ambitious project with new technology, exacting standards and tight timelines," commented TMMC President, Brian Krinock. "Our Team Members have demonstrated time and time again that they thrive on these kinds of challenges."

    The Canadian and Ontario governments partnered with Toyota in 2011, on a multi-project suite of initiatives designed to sustain and grow Toyota’s manufacturing footprint in Canada. This encourages the production of greener, more fuel-efficient vehicles. In March, TMMC announced an investment of $80 million in its Woodstock, Ontario plant. Toyota Motor Manufacturing Canada Inc. has been building quality vehicles in Canada for more than 25 years. TMMC produces the Toyota Corolla, Matrix, RAV4 and RAV4 EV vehicles and the Lexus RX model in assembly plants located in Cambridge, ON and Woodstock, ON.

    More recently, J.D. Power and Associates awarded the TMMC Lexus plant in Cambridge the Gold Plant Quality award for the Americas. TMMC has now been recognized with a total of 11 Plant Quality awards between the two plants, including 6 Gold awards, which is more than any other North American automotive manufacturer. This is TMMC’s third consecutive plant quality award. In 2010 they received the Gold Plant award, and in 2011 tied for the global highest honour Platinum Plant award.

    "For almost nine years now, Canada has had the only Lexus production outside of Japan," states Toyota Motor Manufacturing Canada Inc. Chairman Ray Tanguay.

    In Ontario, there are 11 assembly plants operated by five of the world’s top automakers: Toyota, General Motors, Honda, Ford and Chrysler.

    For over a century now, Ontario has been manufacturing cars and trucks. Ontario has created a dynamic and diversified supply chain from material production and tool, die and mould making, to parts manufacturing and vehicle assembly.

    Ontario’s legacy of high-quality auto making is further bolstered by a sophisticated R&D infrastructure focused on green innovation, generous R&D tax credits, outstanding workers with skills for the 21st century and unparalleled market access.

    Automakers and parts manufacturers worldwide have discovered that there's no better place than Ontario to conduct R&D or assemble the components and cars of the future.

    QUICK FACTS:

    • Ontario is home to over 300 parts manufacturers, including homegrown giants ABC Group, Linamar, Magna International and The Woodbridge Group, as well as foreign-based companies such as Aisin Seiki, Amino, Brose, Dana, Denso, Johnson Controls, Lear, Nemak and Wegu.
    • Manufacturers doing research in Ontario have access to thousands of world-leading scientists at 30 auto-focused public research facilities. Their research involves re-thinking virtually every aspect of vehicle design and assembly.
    • Ontario has 44 highly respected universities and colleges offering degree and certificate programs in various automotive fields such as automotive design, engineering and production, and business management. The apprenticeship and co-operative education programs provide students with critical, real-world experience. Ontario made vehicles are made by our high-skilled workers.

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  • GENBAND selects new location in Ontario, Canada for its R&D centre of excellence

    Texas-based GENBAND, a leading developer of IP infrastructure and application solutions has selected Ontario, Canada as home to their R&D centre of excellence. This new lab, located in Ottawa, will be home to some of GENBAND's core IP switching and multimedia development teams. Their new location is in the heart of Kanata and Ottawa's High-Tech park area.

    "The Ottawa R&D Centre of Excellence is focused on the GENBAND GENiUS platform, which is the heart and soul of GENBAND's value proposition." says Charlie Vogt, GENBAND's President and CEO. "Our industry is quickly evolving from a hardware-based infrastructure environment to one that is software-centric. Our GENBAND GENiUS platform is at the forefront of this trend, combining multiple software solutions on a common, flexible IP platform, and is a reflection of the advanced technology skills, leadership and expertise of the GENBAND employee population in Ottawa."

    The new GENBAND facility includes more than 70,000 square feet of lab, office, customer support and briefing space. GENBAND's commitment to the new location continues the company's presence in the Ottawa region, which began in 2010 with the successful acquisition and merger of Nortel's carrier VoIP and Application Solutions assets.

    In Ontario, innovation is at the core of our ICT industry. Invention and commercialization come easy. There is a diversified talent pool of more than 300, 000 skilled workers who work with leading infrastructure and communication networks. Thanks to innovative minds and world-class research facilities ICT companies in Ontario are leading the world to new frontiers.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Ontario's ICT industry is recognized globally for its expertise in every sector, including software and systems, wireless and telecommunications, mobile applications, microelectronics, photonics, digital media and green IT.

    • GENBAND recently won the Global Telecoms Business Award for IP Transformation Innovation.

    • This facility will house a range of products in GENBAND's portfolio including the GENBAND GENiUS™ Universal Services Platform, GENWare™ Middleware and GENView™ OAM&P (Operation, Administration, Maintenance and Provisioning) System.

    • GENBAND GENiUS IMS was recently awarded INTERNET TELEPHONY magazine's 2011 Product of the Year for its quality, innovation and ability to meet marketplace needs.

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  • General Motors of Canada invests in Canadian research and development

    General Motors of Canada outlined its commitment to significantly invest in research and development (R&D) activities in Canada. Between 2009 and 2016, GM is making investments totaling $850 million in R&D in Canada, which will provide long-term sustainable benefits to GM and the Canadian automotive sector through 2016 and beyond.

    In 2009 the Federal and Ontario government provided $10.5 billion to assist GM Canada in staying competitive in the auto industry. "We're excited about our future and the possibilities ahead," said Kevin W. Williams, president and managing director, GM Canada.

    Ontario is home to five of the world's top automakers, as well as over 300 innovative parts manufacturers; employing 88,000 highly skilled workers who produced over 2.1 million vehicles in 2011. This is more than any other North American sub-national jurisdiction.

    "GM has long been a Canadian technology and innovation leader and these additional investments will build our expertise in strategic and important technologies even further," said Williams. "Since 2009 alone, employees at our Canadian Engineering Centre have generated nearly 100 records of invention which allow us to offer better solutions for our customers, helping GM to design, build and sell the world's best vehicles."

    QUICK FACTS

    • The University of Ontario Institute of Technology is home to the Automotive Centre of Excellence (ACE). It is the first commercial automotive research, development and innovation centre of its kind in the world.

    • Ontario is home to 11 assembly plants operated by five of the world's top automakers: General Motors, Honda, Toyota, Ford and Chrysler.

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  • Ontario, Canada's McMaster University researchers discover that a drug destroys human cancer stem cells but not healthy ones

    In Hamilton, Ontario, Canada a team of scientists at McMaster University have discovered a drug, thioridazine, successfully kills cancer stem cells in humans while avoiding the toxic side-effects of conventional cancer treatments. Thiroridazine is commonly in use as a treatment for schizophrenia and psychosis.

    Unlike chemotherapy and radiation, thiroridazine appears to have no effect on normal stem cells.

    "The unusual aspect of our finding is the way this human-ready drug actually kills cancer stem cells; by changing them into cells that are non-cancerous," said Mick Bhatia, the principal investigator for the study and scientific director of McMaster's Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute (SCC-RI) in the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine.

    Bhatia and his team found that thioridazine worked at killing cancer stem cells in leukemia and in some types of breast cancer, leaving the healthy cells unharmed. Taking it one step further the researchers took cancerous tissue from humans and transplanted it into mice. Once again, thioridazine was effective at targeting the cancer stem cells.

    The team discovered that thioridazine works through the dopamine receptor on the surface of cancer cells in both leukemia and breast cancer patients, providing the possibility to use it as a biomarker that would allow early detection and treatment of breast cancer and early signs of leukemia progression, he said.

    For 15 years researchers have believed stem cells are the source of many cancers. Canadian researchers were the first to identify cancer stem cells in certain types of leukemia in 1997. Since then cancer stem cells have been identified in blood, breast, brain, lung, gastrointestinal, prostate and ovarian cancer.

    Ontario is one of North America's premier centres for life sciences, and home to a remarkable cluster of top-ranked bio-medical researchers, developers and manufacturers. With 25 research and teaching hospitals employing 10,000 scientists, clinical investigators and other researchers, Ontario is one of the largest biomedical research centres in North America.

    Universities and teaching hospitals spend around $2 billion annually on health research – roughly 30 per cent of all the health research done across Canada by governments, industry, academics and the non-profit sector.

    The next step is to test thioridazine in clinical trials, focusing on patients with acute myeloid leukemia whose disease has relapsed after chemotherapy. Bhatia wants to find out if the drug can put their cancer into remission, and by targeting the root of the cancer (cancer stem cells) prevent the cancer from coming back. Researchers at McMaster have already designed how these trials would be done.

    Using a fully automated robotic system developed by the researchers of McMaster University they plan to test more than a dozen different compounds in order to identify several other drugs, including thioridazine.

    "Now we can test thousands of compounds, eventually defining a candidate drug that has little effect on normal stem cells but kills the cells that start the tumour," said Bhatia.

    Ontario is a biomedical research powerhouse, with specialized centres across the province conducting investigations into virtually every area of the life sciences.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Ontario, Canada was home to the discovery of stem cells in 1961 by Ernest A. McCulloch and James E. Till.

    • Ontario has an exceptional research community. The University of Toronto's Faculty of Medicine, along with its hospital partners, is the largest life sciences research entity in Canada and the fourth largest in North America. Several other world-renowned organizations – Princess Margaret Hospital, the Hospital for Sick Children, the Ottawa Heart Institute – also call Ontario home.

    • Ontario has 120 pharmaceutical and biotechnology firms with over 15,000 employees.

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  • Ontario, Canada at the forefront of medical imaging technologies

    Ontario, Canada is leading the way with a new standard of excellence in the clinical investigation of novel molecular imaging-based diagnostic technologies for disease prevention, early detection, and image-guided treatment.

    Scientists and clinicians are working with academic and industry partners to develop tools to bring molecular imaging, and advanced diagnostic technologies to patients in a research setting.

    The Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute's (TBRRI) current focus is cancer. From this came a spin-off company, XLV Diagnostics Inc., a medical imaging system that will be applied to mammography to improve access to screening and aid diagnosis of breast cancer.

    The XLV Diagnostics team, led by world-renowned researcher Dr. John Rowlands, created the X-ray Light Value (XLV), an inexpensive, efficient, and portable alternative to digital X-rays with less radiation exposure.

    The XLV combines three well-established technologies: amorphous-Se photoconductor, liquid crystal display and digital scanner readout, to achieve a low-cost but high quality digital x-ray detector system. With this technology x-ray absorption, image formation and amplification stages are incorporated within a simple, compact structure and entirely eliminates problems related to a secondary quantum sink.

    This technology will significantly reduce manufacturing costs in comparison to the flat-panel detectors currently in use in digital x-ray systems. It is entering the marketing for digital mammography, but has general applications in medical x-ray.

    XLV Diagnostics is an example of an Ontario firm developing innovative, world-class medical technologies that address significant issues in global healthcare, and is supported by Sunnybrook Research Institute (SRI), Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR) and MaRS Innovation.

    Ontario is home to many of the world's most innovate companies in biotechnology, advanced medical technologies, pharmaceuticals research and biomedical manufacturing. Our products, technologies and systems are in use worldwide to improve lives and healthcare.

    Ontario's universities and teaching hospitals spend almost $2 billion annually on health research, which is roughly 30 per cent of all the health and research done across Canada by governments, industry, academics and the non-profit sectors.

    QUICK FACTS

    • The TBRRI was funded by the Ontario Research Fund Research Excellence program.

    • XLV technology has a wide range of applications in radiography, and is less expensive to manufacture that the current imaging tools used in the industry today.

    • The digital mammography marketplace is growing at a rate of 20 per cent with sales of $1 billion annually.

    • Ontario's Technology Acceleration Program provided $750,000 towards the commercialization of the tumour Margin Assessment Machine (MAM).

    • Dr. John Rowlands' advanced medical imagining technology is already in use by radiologists worldwide to produce continuous digital images.

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  • Ontario, Canada-made KidsArm extends a hand in paediatric surgery

    The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Ontario, Canada continues to be at the forefront of advanced medical technology innovation. The hospital's newest innovation is KidsArm, a robotic surgical system designed for operating on small children and babies.

    Leading this project is Dr. James Drake, head of the Centre of Image-Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention (CIGITI), who brought together surgeons, engineers and software developers from universities and businesses to develop KidsArm.

    Ontario, Canada is a global leader in medical innovation with breakthroughs like the first successful childhood meningitis vaccine, and the development of the world's first prosthetic elbow joint, biological artificial cornea, and antibody coated stent.

    KidsArm is a tabletop surgical tool for minimally invasive operations using a pair of hand controllers. It will enable surgeons to navigate to the treatment region, avoiding dangerous structures such as blood vessels, and perform procedures at a rate that is at least ten times faster than a surgeon.

    The aim of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) robot technology is to increase surgical efficiency, safety, accessibility, and patient care. The technology combines integrated imaging elements of magnetic resonance (MR), ultrasound and video to create a smart 3D image for better real-time navigation. It creates virtual reality-based models that are used in surgical planning and teaching, giving surgeons a better idea of what to expect before the operation begins.

    Using image-guided robotics can shift the process of surgical procedures through the development of incision-less surgery; decreasing the risk of infection, improving recovery time and patient care.

    A key factor in Ontario's history of innovation is that the province is home to a growing number of internationally recognized centres of excellence in research, innovation, and collaboration. At institutions like SickKids', creative scientists are encouraged to translate their innovative, high-impact ideas into new treatments and technologies, making them accessible to the world. Other institutions like the Ontario Brain Institute, the International Cancer Genome Consortium at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, and the Population Health Research Institute at McMaster, are also home to innovative breakthroughs in the life sciences sector.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Ontario is one of the largest biomedical research centres in North America, with research centres across the province conducting investigations into practically every area of the life sciences.

    • The Centre for Image-Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention is working in partnership with MDA Corporation, Philips and L-3 Communications MAPPS Inc. towards the development of KidsArm.

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  • Ontario, Canada Ranked Among Top Globally for Foreign Direct and Total Capital Investment<BR><BR>World's Leading Region for Renewable Energy Projects in 2011

    Ontario, Canada attracted more foreign capital investment in 2011 than any North American state or province except Alberta, according to a report recently released by the Financial Times' fDi Intelligence think-tank.

    The report, titled "The fDi report 2012 - Global greenfield investment trends", shows that last year, Ontario attracted 135 foreign direct investment projects worth an estimated US$7.1 billion, or 7 per cent of total FDI value in North America. It was an impressive show of strength for Canada's economic powerhouse and the seventh largest economy on the continent.

    Renewable energy projects were a big win for Ontario, which landed 11 contracts in the sector – the most among all U.S. states and provinces. The report states that, "Ontario was the world's leading region for renewable energy projects in 2011." Energy was a major area of capital investment in North America, with renewable energy, coal, oil and natural gas accounting for 34 per cent of FDI dollars in 2011. The renewable sector energy alone saw US$12 billion in capital investment last year.

    Global companies are drawn to Ontario because of its stable and growing economy, skilled and reliable workforce, environment of innovation, proximity to market, competitive business costs and quality of life. The latest numbers reinforce the province's growing status as a top destination for foreign direct investment. Over the last five years, the number of FDI projects in Ontario has climbed steadily, from 69 in 2006 to almost double that number in 2011.

    Number of Foreign Direct Investment Projects in Ontario, 2003-2011

    Source: fDi Intelligence, April 2012

    Ontario is one of four jurisdictions that, collectively, attracted 33 per cent of FDI projects that came to North America in 2011. California, New York and Texas are the other jurisdictions in this group.

    Although California and New York – which are larger economic jurisdictions than Ontario – netted more projects at 229 and 150, respectively, Ontario still came out ahead with more projects per 1,000,000 of the population.

    More than 10,300 Ontario jobs were created as a result of the new FDI projects. By comparison, California, with a population of almost 38 million versus Ontario's 13.4 million, generated employment for over 11,400 workers from its new FDI projects.

    In the information and communication technologies sector, Ontario ranked third with 29 FDI projects, behind California and New York. It ranked fourth in life sciences, with seven projects.

    The United States remained Ontario's largest source of FDI projects, providing 52 per cent of all projects that came to the province last year. Germany, China, France, the U.K. and Japan accounted for 25 per cent of FDI projects in Ontario in 2011.

    Ontario projects by investment source country, 2011

    Source: fDi Intelligence, April 2012

    QUICK FACTS

    • Ontario was the world's leading region for renewable energy projects in 2011.

    • In terms of capital investment, coal, oil and natural gas and renewable energy were the top two sectors for foreign direct investment in 2011, accounting for 34% of the capital investment that came to North America.

    • Ontario ranked ahead of all North American states and provinces for total capital investment except Alberta.

    • Ontario ranked second for total jobs created with over 10,300 jobs.
    • Ontario ranked third for the total foreign direct investment projects, with 135 total projects (even though it is the seventh largest economy among states/provinces in the United States and Canada).

    • Four states/provinces attracted 33% of the foreign direct investment projects that came to North America in 2011 - California, New York, Ontario and Texas.

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  • Ontario, Canada Helps Bring Cutting-Edge Water Filtration System to Market

    Ontario, Canada is helping Fibracast Ltd. bring to market an innovative water treatment technology with a $1.29 million grant through its Innovation Demonstration Fund (IDF).

    The Ontario-based company has developed a new membrane technology for purifying drinking water and treating wastewater that costs less than half as much to produce as competing products. As Fibracast's new purification system will be significantly less expensive than most non-membrane filtration technologies, it could become a product of choice for drinking water filtration, wastewater treatment, and industrial pure-water treatment.

    Ontario's innovative water technology and wastewater treatment services sectors make the province the North American leader in water protection and treatment solutions. As an established – and still growing – clean technology hub, Ontario is fostering the climate for investment, innovation, expertise, and cutting-edge research into water-related technologies that have gained international recognition.

    "Fibracast Ltd. selected Ontario for our global headquarters because it is the best place in the world to develop new technology," said John Tomescu, Chief Executive Officer, Fibracast Ltd. "Ontario has an abundance of world-class engineering and manufacturing talent, which is supported by strong government programs to help new companies become established, innovate and launch breakthrough technologies. No successful technology development can be a 'one man show' anymore. Ontario offers a pool of local dynamic companies capable of working side by side with us and delivering state-of-the-art custom-made equipment."

    The funding to Fibracast provides financial support of up to 50% of eligible costs to help Ontario companies pilot demonstrations that will lead to the commercialization of processes and/or products in Ontario that are globally competitive, innovative green technologies.

    Ontario firms provide globally renowned expertise in ultraviolet disinfection, compact sewage treatment, water information and systems software, and plant design and operation.

    Ontario companies are leading the way globally, selling technologies and services for water around the world. Across the province, the clean water industry employs 22,000 and generates $1.8 billion in sales.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Ontario is a top 10 global centre for water related patent activity.

    • Filtration membranes are becoming the standard for water and wastewater treatment in developed countries due to their exceptional ability to filter out most bacteria, viruses, and parasites.

    • The water technology sector is valued at more than $400 billion worldwide, doubling every five to six years.

    • Fibracast will begin commercial sales of its purification system in 2013.

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  • Innovative Clean-Tech Venture Capital Fund Comes to Ontario, Canada

    A new venture capital fund is launching in Ontario, Canada that will help the province's cutting-edge clean technology companies grow. The $100-million fund is a joint venture of SAIL Venture Partners, part of California-based SAIL Capital Partners, and Stifel Nicolaus Canada Inc., a subsidiary of Stifel Financial. It will invest in companies with innovative, ready-for-market products across the clean-tech sector, including energy, water and green innovations.

    SAIL Venture Partners is one of the first American clean-tech venture capital funds to come to Ontario and this new fund represents a strong vote of confidence in the quality of Ontario's clean-tech sector.

    Ontario, Canada, a recognized world leader and an established hub for renewable energy, energy management, and water and environmental technologies, continues to forge a bright green future for clean technology investment and growth.

    "By fostering clean-tech innovation and business," said Walter Schindler, Managing Partner, SAIL Capital Partners, "Ontario will benefit by being at the forefront of this burgeoning industry and job creation. Ontario is helping to create the next frontier of clean technology, becoming the capital of clean-tech in Canada, and SAIL is excited to be a part of this development."

    Through support and guidance provided by Sustainable Development Technology Canada, SAIL was attracted to Ontario because of the significant opportunities in the clean-tech sector and a record of fostering innovation.

    Ontario's Green Energy and Green Economy Act (GEA), passed in 2009, places a priority on establishing Ontario as the North American leader in producing and using clean and renewable sources of energy including wind, water, solar, biomass and biogas power.

    Although Ontario has been home to renewable energy development for decades, the adoption of the GEA has seen fast and significant growth in the province's renewable energy sector, including manufacturing, R&D, and major energy generation projects.

    "SAIL Venture Partners investing in Ontario's clean energy economy is a clear sign of the economic opportunities that exist in the province," says Ontario Minister of Energy Chris Bentley. "The clean-tech sector is a key part of Ontario's plan to create and support good jobs, replace dirty coal and build a healthier future for generations to come."

    QUICK FACTS

    • Ontario's clean energy strategy has leveraged more than $27 billion in new investment and economic opportunities.

    • Ontario's environmental sector (which includes clean tech) is worth an estimated $8 billion in annual revenues and $1 billion in export earnings.

    • SAIL has invested in a number of today's leading clean-tech companies, including Xtreme Power, The Cleantech Group, Dow Kokam, Enerpulse, Activeion, SNTech, FlexEnergy, Paragon Airheater Technologies, Ice Energy, M2 Renewables, Clean Technology Solutions, CNS Response, and WaterHealth International.

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  • Ontario, Canada Attracts Cutting-Edge IBM Research & Development Centre

    Ontario and IBM Canada are partnering with several leading Ontario universities to create a new $210 million world-class virtual Research and Development Centre in Ontario.

    IBM will invest up to $175 million through December 2014 in the project, forming the "IBM Canada Research and Development Centre" to serve as a foundation for the research initiative. The Government of Ontario is investing $15 million towards the creation of this Centre; ensuring that the skills needed for developing future information and communications technology products and services are fostered in Ontario, new and existing Ontario companies are leaders in their fields, and innovation efficiencies and cost-savings are created across multiple sectors.

    Thousands of researchers at Ontario universities and colleges are working with companies in every area of ICT including photonics, mobile apps, industrial virtual reality, satellite communications and specialized e-devices. Ontario's R&D tax incentives are among the most generous in the world. An expenditure of $100 can be reduced to an after-tax cost of approximately $56 - or $38 for small businesses. The province also has a range of targeted programs that can help innovative businesses expand.

    John Lutz, President, IBM Canada, said "As we begin a new century of innovation for IBM, we're investing in this industry-building initiative to further advance Canada's competitiveness in the global digital economy, both now and in the future. Together with our government, academic and industry partners, we will apply new, collaborative approaches to Canada's productivity and competitiveness challenges by more fully leveraging IBM's 100-year legacy of research and development leadership here in Ontario."

    The Government of Canada will contribute $20 million to allow a consortium of seven southern Ontario post-secondary institutions and IBM to install two high-performance IBM Blue Gene/Q supercomputers and develop a cloud computing and agile computing platform to underpin the initiative's research collaboration. The university consortium will have access to a new Barrie, Ontario based IBM data centre, which will be fully operational in the fall of 2012. Other Canadian researchers and small to medium-sized enterprises will also be invited to join the consortium.

    The new IBM Canada Research and Development Centre will use state-of-the-art computer infrastructure to drive innovative discoveries in key areas and bring them to market. The Centre's research will focus on:

    • Data management for health care, such as technology that can help doctors detect life threatening conditions in premature babies 24 hours earlier
    • Water conservation and management, such as reducing pollution in water systems by monitoring sewer systems and spotting problems in a pipeline before a leak
    • Energy management, such as finding better ways to track how hydro flows, reducing waste and saving customers money, and
    • Rapid urbanization and aging infrastructure in our cities, such as managing traffic lights to improve traffic flow.

    The research projects will be supported by an expansion of IBM's software development labs in Markham and Ottawa, and the new high performance data centre in Barrie.

    "This is a very exciting initiative that demonstrates Ontario is a leader in cutting-edge research," said Brad Duguid, Minister of Economic Development and Innovation. "Thanks to Ontario's commitment to building an innovation-driven economy – with leading research institutions, a highly educated workforce and a favourable corporate tax environment – we are attracting world-leading initiatives, like IBM Canada's Research and Development Centre."

    Ontario has become a North American hot spot for ICT. The province offers everything leading ICT companies need to succeed: a smart, skilled workforce, outstanding researchers and research facilities, exceptional R&D tax credits, among the lowest business costs in the G7 and an enviable quality of life that is needed to attract top talent. Ontario also has a government that's making ICT research and commercialization a priority.

    QUICK FACTS

    • In 2010, the information and communications technology sector employed about 276,000 people in Ontario, almost half of the Canadian total.

    • The Greater Toronto Area (GTA) is the third-largest ICT cluster in North America.
    • The project adds to IBM's more than $6-billion global R&D investment last year that helped generate over $1.7 billion in exports for Canada.

    • IBM opened its first Canadian office in Ontario in 1917. Today its software development lab in Markham is home to the largest team of IBM software professionals outside the United States.

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  • Red tape reduced in Ontario, Canada: Businesses stand to save $136 million annually

    The Government of Canada and the Government of Ontario, Canada recently released the results of a study that estimates that Ontario businesses will save $136.7 million a year as the result of the single administration of Ontario's corporate tax by the Canada Revenue Agency.

    Reducing regulatory burdens on business and giving companies that invest in Ontario the tools they need to grow is a high priority. The Province is committed to ensuring that for every new regulation, two existing regulations will be eliminated.

    The report was prepared by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP after it conducted a large-scale survey of businesses in Ontario. The survey results showed that single administration will save businesses an estimated $136.7 million annually and that 90 per cent of the total savings will be realized by small businesses.

    The results come only months after Ontario announced sweeping efforts to slash slash red tape for business.

    In autumn 2011, when Forbes magazine ranked Canada the #1 Best Country for Business in its influential annual ranking, the magazine lauded Ontario's tax policies, especially, as a key factor of Canada's business success: "Credit a reformed tax structure with a Harmonized Sales Tax introduced in Ontario and British Columbia in 2010. The goal is to make Canadian businesses more competitive. Canada's tax status also improved thanks to reduced corporate and employee tax rates."

    "In addition to the $136.7 million identified in this report, the harmonization of the provincial sales tax through the HST has further reduced the cost of paperwork on businesses in Ontario, said Dwight Duncan, Ontario Minister of Finance. Our government remains committed to working with our federal partners to remove overlap and duplication."

    QUICK FACTS

    • Ontario's regulatory environment is balanced and transparent. Compliance is relatively easy and straightforward.

    • In Ontario, entrepreneurs and investors can get businesses started fast. It takes on average only one simple step to start a business, compared to as many as 20 needed in other industrialized countries.

    • In 2011, Forbes.com named Ontario a top destination for foreign direct investment in North America and gave the province top rankings in various areas including job creation, tax reform and health care.

    • Doing business in Ontario, Canada means enjoying all the benefits of operating in a country ranked by the World Bank as 7th out of 183 countries for ease of doing business.  Canada also placed 7th out of 58 countries in the IMD World Competitiveness Scoreboard 2011.

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  • 2012 Ontario Budget: Strong action for economic growth and investment success

    Ontario's proposed 2012 Budget re-affirms Ontario's commitment to maintaining a strong and diversified economy; ensuring the province's global competitiveness and supporting investment growth and business success. Provisions of the budget are also designed to help businesses invest in innovation and improve productivity.

    Measures proposed in the Budget, when fully implemented, will further strengthen Ontario's reputation as one of the most stable and secure jurisdictions in the industrialized world for new investment. They will also cement Ontario's reputation as a place where new ideas and innovation thrive.

    Stabilizing the Corporate Income Tax Rate

    Following a comprehensive initiative begun in 2009, Ontario's general corporate income tax (CIT) rate has fallen from 14 per cent in 2009 to 11.5 per cent. The small business CIT rate has been reduced to 4.5 per cent from 5.5 per cent, and the small business deduction surtax has been eliminated, which extends this lower CIT rate to growing small businesses.

    With a total combined provincial (11.5 per cent) and federal (15 per cent) corporate income tax rate of 26.5 per cent, Ontario's combined general federal-provincial CIT rate is lower than the average of G8 and G20 countries and lower than the average federal-state CIT rate in the United States.

    Bar chart image showing Ontario's Internationally Competitive CIT Rate

    The 2012 Budget proposes to keep the general CIT rate at 11.5 per cent until Ontario's budget is balanced. Ontario is scheduled to return to a balanced budget in 2017–18. At that time, planned CIT rate reductions would resume and the general CIT rate would continue to fall.

    Table image showing Ontario's Revised Corporate Income Tax Rate Cut Plan

    Ontario has already proven to be a cost effective centre for business. In early 2012, the Government of Canada and the Government of Ontario, Canada released the results of a study that estimates that Ontario businesses will save $136.7 million a year as the result of the single administration of Ontario's corporate tax by the Canada Revenue Agency.

    Strengthening Ontario's Skilled Workforce

    Ontario has one of the best educated workforces in the G7. Ontario's apprenticeship system is a key part of building the well-educated and highly skilled workforce that investors have come to depend on to operate, innovate and succeed.

    Over the past eight years, Ontario has significantly expanded its apprenticeship system. The Ontario Apprenticeship Training Tax Credit (ATTC), along with other provincial apprenticeship program measures, have helped to increase the availability of skilled workers in Ontario's economy. Today, more than 120,000 apprentices are learning a trade in Ontario. Annual apprenticeship enrolment is up from 17,000 in 2002–03 to nearly 30,000 in 2010–11.

    The 2012 Budget proposes that Ontario will further support apprenticeship programs to ensure support to key sectors, further strengthening the skilled workforce that global investors have come to rely on when they come to Ontario. Measures will include:

    • introducing technical literacy and numeracy support to apprenticeship training and expanding examination preparation courses to help apprentices complete their training;

    • enhancing connections between apprenticeship and employment services to facilitate links between individuals and employers;

    • reviewing the effectiveness and efficiency of the Ontario Apprenticeship Training Tax Credit.

    Jobs and Prosperity Fund

    Ontario currently provides about $2 billion in annual support to business, including targeted tax expenditures, through more than 40 different programs across at least seven ministries. These programs have encouraged business investment, jobs and economic growth. The 2012 Ontario budget proposes a transformation of existing business support programs to provide better coordination, clarify objectives, and avoid duplication and unnecessary costs.

    Under these provisions, Ontario would consolidate many of its programs into one Jobs and Prosperity Fund that will focus on supporting productivity growth and job creation in the business sector. It will target a reduction in administrative costs of at least 25 per cent. The Fund will support businesses and enhance productivity and innovation in the province's many areas of economic strength. It will help businesses compete in the global marketplace.

    Reaching Out to Global Markets

    The U.S. market accounted for 77 per cent of Ontario's international merchandise exports in 2011. This market will remain vital to Ontario but is expected to grow at a much slower pace than emerging economies such as those of Brazil, India and China. The Province has strong relationships with many of the world's emerging economies and will build upon these important ties.

    The government will also continue to diversify Ontario's exports. It will focus its export promotion efforts on the key strengths of Ontario's economy, including the clean energy technology sector.

    The Canadian government, with the participation of Ontario and other provinces, is currently negotiating a Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with the European Union (EU), one of the largest and richest markets in the world. This will help Ontario companies diversify and open new trade and investment opportunities in the EU.

    Continuing to Grow a World-Leading Financial Services Sector

    Ontario's financial services sector continues to grow. Toronto is the financial capital of Canada and one of the top 10 financial centres in the world based on the Global Financial Centres Index. Ontario continues to update and adapt the province's financial regulations to better protect investors and support a more vibrant financial services sector, including the securities and insurance industries.

    Table image showing Top 10 Global Financial Centres

    Canada has a sophisticated, highly advanced financial system that is supported by an internationally respected regulatory and supervisory framework. In 2011, for the fourth year in a row, the Geneva-based, nonprofit World Economic Forum found that Canada has the world's soundest banking system. The Ontario government continues to support a strong securities regulatory framework. Over half of Canadian securities industry GDP and employment and 80 per cent of market activity take place in Ontario. Accordingly, the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) must be well equipped to respond to the challenges that arise in the capital markets that it is mandated to oversee.

    Ensuring Stability and Growth for Investment Success

    The 2012 Ontario Budget helps ensure that Ontario remains a cost competitive and dynamic business environment that can drive investor growth, opportunity, and innovation.

    Ontario offers investors a stable and growing economy, a highly educated and skilled workforce, an environment of innovation, excellent proximity to the $17-trillion NAFTA marketplace and global markets, competitive business costs, and a great quality of life. These factors and more should continue to assure international investors that Ontario is the best choice for investment growth and business success.

    Contact us

    For more information about the 2012 Ontario Budget, please visit: http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/

    Tel: 416-313-3469
    Fax: 416-360-1817

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    www.investinontario.com/contactus
    E-mail: info@investinontario.com

    Follow us on Twitter: @InvestOntario



  • Ontario, Canada-based Seneca College builds software for game-changing Raspberry Pi computer

    Raspberry Pi, a new, fully functional computer set to sell for less than $40, features made-in-Ontario, Canada software built and adapted by Seneca College's Centre for Development of Open Technology (CDOT). When the computer was launched in early March, distributors' websites initially crashed before selling out within hours of the announcement.

    Ontario is a North American hot spot for ICT. The province offers everything leading ICT companies need to succeed: a smart, skilled workforce, outstanding researchers and research facilities, exceptional R&D tax credits, low business costs and an enviable quality of life that attracts top talent. Ontario also has a government that's making ICT research and commercialization a priority.

    "These low-cost computers will improve the access to technology worldwide, particularly for students," said Seneca College President David Agnew. "It is rewarding to see Seneca students and faculty from across Toronto, Ontario using their expertise to build and adapt software for this breakthrough device."

    Raspberry Pi features made-in-Ontario, Canada software
    Raspberry Pi features made-in-Ontario, Canada software.

    Ontario's ICT industry is recognized globally for its expertise in every sector, including software and systems, wireless and telecommunications, microelectronics, photonics, digital media and green IT. Ontario ICT companies are leading the world to new frontiers, thanks to innovative minds and world-class research facilities.

    The energy-efficient Raspberry Pi can run off 4AA batteries, use a TV as a monitor and store data on SD cards. A basic software package developed at Seneca College in Toronto, including a custom version of the Linux Fedora operating system and basic tools like a web browser and word processor, are available for the device.

    The Raspberry Pi Fedora Remix 14 provides a complete software environment for the Raspberry Pi, a highly anticipated computer system designed to spur interest in computer science, software development, and electronic technology among young people. It also allows Raspberry Pi to be used for many of the things that desktop PCs do such as spreadsheets, word processing, games, and playing high-definition video.

    "Ontario students and faculty have helped to make Raspberry Pi a reality," said Eben Upton, Director of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. "As a free software-based platform, we're very dependent on Linux and the open source community at large to provide our users with a working environment complete with programming languages, productivity applications and educational software."

    This software release marks an important milestone in CDOT's applied research in building open source software for emerging low-energy ARM systems. ARM chips are known for combining a high level of functionality with extremely low power consumption. This software will power a new generation of computer systems, ranging from the Raspberry Pi to new models of the One Laptop Per Child project to high-density server systems that consume a tiny fraction of the power used by traditional data centres.

    "I jumped at the chance to work on this project because I knew it would be invaluable experience," said Paul Whalen, Seneca Computer Systems Technology graduate, CDOT research assistant and professor. "This year I saw the students' growing excitement as they learned about the computer and their imaginations are running wild with applications they can create. It's amazing to think we were involved with bringing Fedora to the ARM architecture in support of devices like the Raspberry Pi."

    Seneca's Centre of Development of Open Technology (CDOT) provides a physical and virtual environment for the development and research of open source software through collaboration with Seneca, the open source community, business and other institutions. The centre is an integration point for knowledge, education, and relationships within the open source world.

    Thousands of researchers at places like Seneca College's CDOT and other Ontario universities and colleges work in every area of ICT, including photonics, bioinformatics, 3D imaging, broadband/satellite/mobile/wireless communications and next generation e-devices.

    Organizations such as the Centre of Excellence for Communications and Information Technology, the Canadian Microelectronics Corporation and MaRS facilitate technology transfers and multi-party ICT partnerships.

    Ontario also has a business friendly approach to intellectual property. The province offers companies the opportunity to acquire the rights to the IP developed at our public research centres.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Five of the world's ten biggest ICT companies conduct R&D in Ontario (GE, IBM, Siemens, Cisco and Intel).

    • Ontario has among the best R&D tax credits of the G7 countries. More costs qualify for R&D tax credits in Ontario than in the U.S. Ontario and federal tax credits can cut the after-tax cost of a $100 R&D expenditure to an average of about $41.49 depending on company size and manufacturing practices.

    • Over 276,400 people work in Ontario's ICT industry.

    • With 17,000+ firms and annual revenues of $75 billion+, Ontario has one of North America's largest concentrations of ICT leaders.

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  • Ontario Companies Win at Academy Awards – Achievements In Film Honoured With Scientific And Technical Awards

    Ontario's innovative film industry has been recognized internationally, with two Ontario teams presented with awards at the annual Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Scientific and Technical Awards.

    Toronto-based Side Effects Software won the Technical Achievement Award for their software that improves rendering of digital special effects such as smoke and clouds. The Ontario-made software is being used in blockbusters, such as Transformers: Dark of the Moon and Puss in Boots.

    Hamilton-based PV Labs received a Scientific and Engineering Award for the development of a camera mount that provides more stable images when filming scenes from a helicopter. The technology is being used in several Hollywood blockbusters, including The Hangover 2, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn and the upcoming The Dark Knight Rises.

    In addition, all six of the films nominated for an Academy Award® for Achievement in Visual Effects feature the artistry of graduates or professors of Seneca College's Visual Effects for Film and Television program. Their work includes visual effects for Martin Scorsese's 3D children's adventure Hugo, which won five Oscar® awards and led the nominees for the 2012 Academy Awards® with 11 nominations. In the other nominated films (Planet of the Apes, Real Steel, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows: Part 2 and Transformers: Dark Side of the Moon), Seneca graduates worked as compositors – effects artists who combine a number of images to create the final.

    Kim Davidson, Co-Founder and President and CEO, Side Effects Software says, "Ontario is home to the third largest film industry in North America. As a company, we've benefited from the exceptional talent coming out of Ontario's universities and colleges, and the tremendous government support for the industry."

    Digital media production contributes almost $1.5 billion annually to Ontario's economy and employs 16,000 people, up from 8,000 in 2000. Leading media companies have invested millions to set up and expand studios in partnership with the Ontario government.

    Ontario is committed to building an innovation-focused economy through postsecondary education and technology with partnerships like the Screen Industries Research and Training Centre. New digital media technologies spur development in video games, movie making and web applications and help create jobs for Ontario graduates.

    Supporting made-in-Ontario technology is part of Ontario's plan to strengthen the province's position as a global leader in entertainment production.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Ontario's film and television industry supports nearly 30,000 jobs and contributed $1.26 billion to Ontario's economy in 2011, an increase of 31 per cent over 2010.

    • Ontario's tax credits to support the film and television industry are valued at $290 million annually.

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  • Ontario, Canada Slashing Red Tape for Business

    Ontario, Canada won kudos from Canadian business leaders for taking significant steps in recent years to make the Province a more attractive place to invest and do business. Since 2008, the Province has reduced the number of regulatory requirements by 17.2 per cent.

    Canada already boasts the fewest steps required to start a business. Ontario, with these recent reductions and tax reforms, including the introduction of the Harmonized Sales Tax (HST), has streamlined administration with the federal government and eliminated duplication even further. Moving to the HST eliminated outdated rules, regulations and procedures and is saving businesses $500 million per year.

    In autumn 2011, when Forbes magazine ranked Canada the #1 Best Country for Business in its influential annual ranking, the magazine lauded Ontario's tax policies, especially, as a key factor of Canada's business success: "Credit a reformed tax structure with a Harmonized Sales Tax introduced in Ontario and British Columbia in 2010. The goal is to make Canadian businesses more competitive. Canada's tax status also improved thanks to reduced corporate and employee tax rates."

    Reducing regulatory burdens on business and giving companies that invest in Ontario the tools they need to grow is a high priority. The Province is committed to ensuring that for every new regulation, two existing regulations will be eliminated.

    QUICK FACTS

    • With a total combined provincial (11.5 per cent) and federal (15 per cent) corporate income tax rate of 26.5 per cent, Ontario's combined general federal-provincial corporate income tax (CIT) rate is lower than the average of G8 and G20 countries and lower than the average federal-state CIT rate in the United States.

    • In Ontario, entrepreneurs and investors can get businesses started fast. It takes on average only one simple step to start a business, compared to as many as 20 needed in other industrialized countries.

    • Ontario's regulatory environment is balanced and transparent. Compliance is relatively easy and straightforward.

    • Companies in Ontario have access to a wide range of government programs that can help accelerate growth and new product development.


  • Ontario, Canada Helps Innovative Company to Pilot New Cutting-edge Clean Tech System

    Ontario, Canada is helping Pond Biofuels build cutting-edge technology that will help clean the air we breathe.

    With the province's support, Pond Biofuels is piloting a new, high-tech CO2 absorption system at St. Marys Cement. The new system will reduce greenhouse gases by absorbing dirty smokestack emissions to grow algae which can be used in oil production, converted into biodiesel and bioplastics or act as a renewable coal substitute.

    Martin Vroegh, Corporate Environment Manager at St. Marys Cement, says, "This partnership between St. Marys Cement and Pond Biofuels, made possible with the support of the Government of Ontario, reinforces St. Marys Cement's commitment to producing the most sustainable building materials available. With our goal of near-zero emission cement manufacturing and a biofueled distribution fleet, the most sustainable energy projects, green buildings, homes and highways of tomorrow will soon be a reality."

    Pond anticipates progressing to a full-scale commercial facility at St. Marys by 2014.

    "Solving the problem of industrial emissions requires industry, government, technology and capital all working together," says Steve Martin, the CEO of Pond Biofuels. "We have that here, with Pond Biofuels providing the technology, St. Marys as our commercialization partner, angel investors in the Biomaterials Investment Group and support from the Province of Ontario. Going forward, Pond's made-in-Ontario technology can be applied to other essential industries, like steel, power generation and resource extraction."

    QUICK FACTS

    • One tonne of algae can yield 100 litres or more of biodiesel.

    • Algae is one of the fastest growing organisms in the world, consuming almost twice its weight in carbon dioxide.

    • The estimated global market for biofuels in 2011 was $82.7 billion and is forecasted to rise to $185 billion by 2021.

    • Ontario is home to around 2,400 environmental industry companies, which employ more than 60,000 people.

    • According to a 2008 study from the Canadian Medical Association, Ontario's economic cost related to air pollution, in terms of lost productivity, healthcare costs, quality of life and loss of life, is almost $4 billion.

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  • Ontario, Canada's Niagara Tunnel Project Reaches Construction Milestone – Ontario Increasing Clean, Renewable Power

    Construction on the Niagara Tunnel Project in Ontario, Canada has reached a significant milestone with half of the tunnel now fully lined with concrete.

    When it is finished, the smooth concrete lining will ensure the efficient and uninterrupted flow of Niagara River water through this 10.2 km tunnel to the Sir Adam Beck generating stations for the next 100 years.

    Ontario's Green Energy and Green Economy Act (GEA), passed in 2009, places a priority on establishing Ontario as the North American leader in producing and using clean and renewable sources of energy including wind, water, solar, biomass and biogas power.

    Digging the tunnel using the largest hard-rock boring machine in the world, dubbed "Big Becky,: was completed last spring.

    Tom Mitchell, President of Ontario Power Generation, says "The Niagara tunnel is an investment in our future that will provide Ontario with clean, renewable energy for more than 100 years. What's equally impressive is that the men and women who are building this project have worked safely under extremely difficult and challenging conditions. That's a testimony to the quality and skill of Ontario's workforce."

    When complete in 2013, the Niagara Tunnel – one of the largest renewable energy projects of its kind – will supply enough clean, renewable electricity to power 160,000 homes.

    The project currently employs more than 400 people and has brought about $1 billion in economic benefits to the region.

    Strengthening Ontario's hydroelectric infrastructure is an important part of the Ontario Government's plan to build a modern, clean, reliable electricity system to power homes, schools, hospitals and the economy.

    "The Niagara Tunnel Project is an example of how the province is transforming Ontario's electricity system and investing in the clean energy economy," says Chris Bentley, Ontario's Minister of Energy. "We are ensuring a clean, modern, reliable and affordable energy system that will power us today, and for generations to come."

    Ontario is an international hub for developing innovative clean tech solutions and delivering them to markets worldwide.

    The Province's strategic location in North America, long-term government support for alternative energy generation and advanced and diverse manufacturing capabilities, position Ontario as a preferred location for manufacturers of sustainable, alternative energy technologies and related components, service providers and project developers.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Since 2003, more than 100 megawatts of new and refurbished waterpower projects have come online in Ontario - enough power for about 50,000 homes.

    • The Niagara Tunnel is as high as a four-storey building, and will propel water at a rate of 500 cubic metres per second, fast enough to fill an Olympic-sized swimming pool in a matter of seconds.

    • More hydroelectric power will be added to Ontario's electricity system in the next eight years than over the previous 40 years.

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  • Ontario, Canada's Wealth of Talent Fuels Financial Services Success

    For financial services companies looking to expand, Ontario has the institutions, the markets and the infrastructure that can help firms grow rapidly – not just in Canada, but around the world. Ontario also has what is needed to leverage all of these assets: a wealth of talented people.

    Talented people and brainpower, especially, drive success in the Financial Services sector and Ontario has the kind of broad, deep multilingual talent pool growing companies need. More than 358,000 people work in Ontario's finance and insurance sector, and they are well educated. Nearly 80% of Ontario's financial services work-force have postsecondary designations.

    Ontario's MBA programs are consistently ranked among the best in the world. Its talent pool of skilled, well-educated financial services professionals is growing. Toronto, alone, has the second largest chartered financial accountant population outside New York, over 7,200 certified management accountants, over 23,000 financial services IT employees and 7,444 lawyers practicing financial services law in the GTA.

    Ontario works with stakeholders throughout the industry and at all levels of government to ensure that it attracts, retains and trains the best talent available to support and grow this key industry.

    A big reason for Ontario's efforts to nurture its financial services talent pool is that Toronto, Ontario is the heart of Canada's financial services industry. The Province's efforts have yielded great results.

    How successful have we been? Toronto, Ontario's collaborative approach to dealing with talent issues is being held up as a model for other regions to emulate by global institutions like the World Economic Forum. In early 2012, the World Economic Forum invited Janet Ecker, the president of the Toronto Financial Services Alliance (TFSA), to its annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland to discuss Toronto's experience with growing the region's world-class pool of financial services talent.

    The Toronto Financial Services Alliance, a key partner of the Ontario government, is a public/private initiative whose mandate is to enhance and promote the long-term competitiveness of Toronto, Ontario as a premier global financial centre. Its membership encompasses core financial services companies – banks, brokerages, investment fund managers, insurance companies – as well as partner sectors – accounting, law and education.

    Toronto is presented as one of five in-depth case studies highlighted in a report published by the World Economic Forum in collaboration with Mercer.

    The logic of choosing Toronto is clear. Toronto has become one of North America's top financial services hubs. For the second consecutive year, The Banker's 2011 International Financial Centers Index ranks Toronto second of financial centers in North America and seventh of 53 centres globally. The Greater Toronto Area (GTA) is the third largest financial centre in North America by employment after New York and Chicago. Toronto and the GTA are home to five of the largest domestic banks (three ranked among the world's top 50 based on total assets in US$); 55 foreign bank subsidiaries or branches and 119 securities firms; and five of the top 300 global pension funds (three ranked among the top 60 for global AUM). Toronto is also home to the eighth largest stock exchange in the world based on domestic equity market capitalization.

    Entitled "Talent Mobility Good Practices – Collaboration at the Core of Driving Economic Growth" (see: www.weforum.org/TalentMobility2012), the report features the work of Ontario's Centre of Excellence in Financial Services Education, established in 2009 by the TFSA with Government of Ontario support to act as a catalyst to strengthen and expand Toronto's talent pool and elevate the region's global stature as a financial services capital.

    Ms. Ecker's participation at Davos will focus on the case study, "Engaging Stakeholders to Improve an Industry's Global Competitiveness", which outlines the approach adopted by the TFSA and its stakeholder partners to deal with issues of talent mobility in Toronto, Ontario.

    Key findings of the TFSA case include the critical value of establishing a Centre of Excellence in financial services, working to influence the public's perception of the industry and its importance to Toronto, ongoing efforts to promote and market the city, clarity about the sector's talent needs, and more.

    Regarding the World Economic Forum's recognition of the work that Toronto has done, Ms. Ecker says, "We are honoured that the success of our efforts has gained such important international recognition. It is a testament to our public- and private-sector partners."

    Soon after her appearance at Davos, Ms. Ecker will be traveling to London, England, where she'll be among Ontario's represents at City Week 2012: The International Financial Services Forum. Ontario's International Marketing Centre will be hosting Ms. Ecker, who in addition to speaking at the event, will be meeting with a number of companies during her stay in London to discuss investment opportunities in the Toronto financial services sector.

    City Week organizers have assembled an impressive panel of senior and truly international speakers for City Week 2012. Among those speakers will be Ms. Janet Ecker, speaking again on good practices in talent mobility.

    QUICK FACTS

    • The Geneva-based, non-profit World Economic Forum found that Canada has the world's soundest banking system for the fifth year in a row in its influential Global Competitiveness Report 2012-2013. Ontario is the heart of Canada's banking system, and is the headquarters location of 14 major financial institutions, including the top 5 Canadian banks.

    • The Toronto financial services sector – comprised of banks, insurance companies and brokers, securities dealers, pension fund administrators, mutual funds, credit unions, and trust and loan companies, among others – directly accounts for over 14% of the GDP of the Toronto region and over 220,000 jobs.

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  • Ontario, Canada Researchers' Groundbreaking Study Could Lead to Better Stroke Therapies

    Researchers at Ontario, Canada's McMaster University have published a groundbreaking report linking an irregular heartbeat that you don't even feel with an increased risk of stroke. These irregular heartbeats are so subtle only a pacemaker can detect them.

    The study, titled "Subclinical Atrial Fibrillation and the Risk of Stroke" and published in the January 12, 2012 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, says that of nearly 2,600 patients without a history of atrial fibrillation but with a recently implanted pacemaker, more than one-third had episodes when the heartbeat would become rapid and irregular for more than six minutes.

    The international research team that published the report, based at Ontario's Population Health Research Institute, was led by Dr. Jeff Healey, an associate professor of medicine of the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine at McMaster.

    "This study suggests that silent atrial fibrillation is very common and may be the cause of many strokes that previously could not be explained. In all, atrial fibrillation may be responsible for nearly 1 in 5 strokes," said Healey. "This is an important observation as we have very effective and specific therapies to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation, once this heart rhythm disturbance is identified."

    Ontario is a leader in cutting-edge research, development and innovation, making the province an ideal place for international companies to invest and grow. Within the life sciences sector alone, 10,000 scientists, clinical investigators and other researchers at 25 research and academic hospitals conduct $850 million in research annually. Bringing together all these public and private-sector researchers are collaborative networks and organizations that help new ideas converge.

    Ontario's universities and teaching hospitals spend almost $2 billion annually on health research, which is roughly 30 per cent of all the health research done across Canada by governments, industry, academics and the non-profit sectors.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Ontario is a biomedical research powerhouse, with specialized centres across the province conducting investigations into virtually every area of the life sciences.

    • About 41,500 people work in Ontario's life sciences industry.

    • In addition to the Population Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Ontario is home to a growing number of internationally recognized centres of excellence in research, innovation and collaboration, including the International Cancer Genome Consortium at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and the Ontario Brain Institute.

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  • Ontario, Canada Invests in the Aerospace Industry

    Ontario, Canada is helping Safran Electronics Canada better serve its customers and expand its global market reach.

    With the province's support, Safran Electronics Canada is investing in new equipment and expertise at its Peterborough facility to adapt its existing innovative technologies to new markets around the world. Serving the commercial aerospace and defence sectors, the company plans to enhance its line of control units, which are currently used for aircraft engines and landing gears.

    The investment is being made through the Eastern Ontario Development Fund. The $80 million fund is targeted to businesses and economic developers. The program supports projects that create and retain jobs, encourages the introduction of new technologies, and pursues growth in new markets.

    Partnering with local businesses and supporting made-in-Ontario technologies is part of Ontario's plan to strengthen local economies and attract investment.

    QUICK FACTS

    • A subsidiary of Sagem and company of the Safran Group, Safran Electronics Canada develops, produces, and supports embedded electronic systems for aerospace and defence applications.

    • In 2010, Ontario was named a top destination for foreign direct investment in North America, second only to California. The province attracted a total of 127 Foreign Direct Investment projects, which created more than 11,200 jobs.

    • Ontario's corporate income tax rates are internationally competitive. Ontario's combined general federal-provincial corporate income tax rate of 26.5 per cent is lower than the average of G8 and G20 countries and lower than the average federal–state CIT rate in the United States.

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  • Ontario, Canada Supports Novocol Pharmaceuticals Expansion

    Ontario, Canada is helping Novocol Pharmaceuticals of Canada Inc. expand and modernize its Cambridge facility, including converting an outdated production line into an R&D centre. The entire project will help the company diversify and develop new infection control products, increasing the global company's competitiveness.

    In total, Novocol is investing over $54 million in this project over the next five years, which includes a loan of $10 million from the Ontario Government.

    Novocol Pharmaceutical of Canada Inc. (Novocol), and its affiliated owner, Septodont SAS of France, are world leaders in the production of dental anaesthetic cartridges. Novocol controls a large portion of the U.S. market, through its own brands, or the manufacture of other brands, and private label products.

    QUICK FACTS

    • In 2010, Ontario's Pharmaceutical sector exported $5.8 billion in goods.

    • In 2010, Ontario was named a top destination for foreign direct investment in North America, second only to California. The province attracted a total of 127 Foreign Direct Investment projects, which created more than 11,200 jobs.

    • Ontario's corporate income tax rates are internationally competitive. Ontario's combined general federal-provincial corporate income tax rate of 26.5 per cent is lower than the average of G8 and G20 countries and lower than the average federal–state CIT rate in the United States.

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  • General Motors to Make New Impala in Ontario, Canada

    General Motors (GM) announced recently that it will make the next-generation Impala at its Oshawa, Ontario plant. It's a move made possible by the Ontario Government's investment in the auto sector.

    In 2009, Ontario partnered with the Canadian and American governments to help GM restructure. GM has since repaid its loans and announced approximately $1 billion in new investments.

    GM's other investments in Ontario include:

    • $480 million in the engine and transmission facility in St. Catharines.
    • $117 million the production of the new Cadillac XTS in Oshawa.
    • $96 million to expand capacity at its CAMI assembly plant in Ingersoll.
    • The addition of a new shift for GM's Oshawa operations.

    Strengthening the auto sector is part of the Ontario government's plan to protect jobs while growing the economy and ensuring it remains a manufacturing leader in North America.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Ontario builds more cars than any other state or province in North America.

    • The auto sector is a critical component of Ontario's economy, supporting approximately 400,000 jobs.

    • Ontario's corporate income tax rates are internationally competitive. Ontario's combined general federal-provincial corporate income tax rate of 26.5 per cent is lower than the average of G8 and G20 countries and lower than the average federal–state CIT rate in the United States.

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  • Entrepreneurship Alive and Well in G20 "Start-up Paradise"

    Study Ranks Canada One of the Best Countries in the World for Small Business

    A recent, influential report published by Ernst & Young ranks Canada as one of the best places in the world for small business and for fostering an entrepreneurial environment.

    This recognition is on top of other high-profile findings at the national and regional levels. Forbes magazine recently ranked Canada #1 in its list of "Best Countries for Business". And the Financial Times' fDi Intelligence ranked Ontario, Canada as the top North American jurisdiction for FDI projects relative to population in 2010. In June 2011, Toronto, Ontario, Canada leapt into the number two spot in the world in the PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) "Cities of Opportunity" report.

    This latest report, titled "Entrepreneurs Speak Out: A Call to Action for G20 Governments", is drawn from survey results from 1,000 entrepreneurs across the G20 (50 in each country). The study's authors characterize the survey as an "entrepreneurship barometer", providing a snapshot of perceptions of the entrepreneurial environment in the G20 countries.

    The study praises Canada for its "strong entrepreneurial culture." An impressive 88% of respondents believe Canada's culture encourages entrepreneurship. Canada also gets top marks for start-up costs, business confidence, and banking sector strength, as well as coaching and education programs for young entrepreneurs.

    Canada earns praise for its competitive start-up costs, described as the "cheapest of the [G20]". "Canada sounds like the start-up paradise for G20 counterparts," the report states. "These costs have been significantly reduced over the period, dropping by 0.5% of per capita income since 2005." Low start-up costs are attributed in part to how fast businesses can get up and running. With only one procedure needed to start a business, Canada beats all G20 nations.

    QUICK FACTS

    • The Ernst & Young study focuses on the entrepreneurship environment of G20 countries through the lens of five fundamental enablers: entrepreneurship culture; education and training; access to funding; regulation and taxation; and coordinated support.

    • Business climate indicators in Ontario – employment, business confidence, corporate profits – reveal a history of solid growth and ongoing investments. At the national level, the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) April 2011 economic outlook forecasts Canada's gross domestic product to grow 2.8 per cent this year and 2.6 per cent in 2012.

    • According to the Economist Intelligence Unit, Global Business Rankings Canada is the best place for doing business among the G7 over the next five years. Canada ranked third overall out of 82 countries for the forecast period 2010-14.

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  • Ontario, Canada Helping Celestica to Transform Toronto Facility and Diversify Markets

    Ontario, Canada is helping Celestica transform the firm's Toronto facility to focus on higher-growth markets.

    Celestica, a leader in delivery of innovative supply chain solutions to a variety of industries, has locations in the Americas, Asia and Europe.

    The investment from the province will be made over a 5-year timeframe as Celestica continues to diversify its markets and maintain its competitiveness in the global marketplace by expanding its services to include:

    • solar panel and inverter manufacturing for clean energy

    • specialized electronics for aerospace and defence

    • commercialization and after-market services, including tablets, smart phones and other personal communication devices.

    Ontario, Canada's advanced manufacturing sector is built on its leadership and expertise in the aerospace, wind, solar, renewable energy and other growing sectors. Ontario has over 400 companies in the advanced manufacturing sector, employing over 33,000 people and exporting over $1 billion in goods and services. Ontario manufacturers can take advantage of generous R&D support to create efficient solutions for customers around the world.

    "Ontario maintains its commitment to creating jobs and growing the economy," said Brad Duguid, Minister of Economic Development and Innovation. "Award-winning Celestica is among a growing number of Ontario companies that have distinguished themselves in the global marketplace for their commitment to productivity and R&D, and their superior customer service."

    QUICK FACTS

    • Based in Toronto, Celestica delivers innovative supply chain solutions to a number of markets and employs approximately 35,000 people around the globe.

    • Approximately 75,000 Ontarians work in nearly 500 advanced manufacturing and machinery companies.

    • In 2010, Ontario was named a top destination for foreign direct investment in North America, second only to California. The province attracted a total of 127 Foreign Direct Investment projects.

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  • Ontario, Canada Supports Financial Services Growth

    Ontario, Canada is helping Apex Fund Services (Canada) Ltd. expand and create 50 jobs, building on Toronto's reputation as a North American hub for financial services.

    The province is partnering with Apex Fund Services Ltd., a financial services provider, to expand its Canadian subsidiary and offer specialized fund services to Canadian fund managers such as:

    • international best practices

    • real-time middle office administrative services, and

    • operation risk reporting services.

    "Apex is proud to help put Canada firmly on the map as one of the world's fast growing financial centres," said Peter Hughes, Group Managing Director, Apex fund Services Ltd.

    "As a global company, Apex sees Canada to be a key location for the expansion of its personalized services for fund managers – domestically and internationally," said Alex Chapman, Managing Director, Apex Fund Services (Canada) Ltd. "With the current commitment to the Canadian fund industry, this is a tremendous opportunity for Apex to lead the financial services sector and support new fund strategies."

    QUICK FACTS

    • Apex Bermuda has 23 offices around the globe administering funds and asset classes over $16-billion.

    • The hedge fund administration services market is expected to grow as investors diversify their portfolios from traditional mutual funds to alternative strategies available in hedge funds.

    • Over 524,000 jobs have been created in Ontario since October 2003.

    • Ontario's financial and insurance sector employs more than 293,000 people.

    • In 2010, Ontario was named a top destination for foreign direct investment in North America, second only to California. The province attracted a total of 127 Foreign Direct Investment projects, which created more than 11,200 jobs.

    • Ontario's corporate income tax rates are internationally competitive. Ontario's combined general federal-provincial corporate income tax rate of 26.5 per cent is lower than the average of G8 and G20 countries and lower than the average federal–state CIT rate in the United States.

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  • Ontario, Canada Invests in Manufacturing Sector Competitiveness

    Ontario, Canada is investing in McCloskey International Limited as the firm increases its competitiveness by enhancing its facilities, expanding its production capabilities and manufacturing heavy equipment components in-house.

    McCloskey International plans to invest approximately $10 million, including a $750,000 investment from Ontario, and add 60 new jobs to the 173 existing positions at the Peterborough, Ontario-based company. This investment by Ontario will build upon the 97,700 net new jobs that have already been created in Ontario so far this year alone.

    McCloskey International, which provides solutions and services for crushing, screening and recycling equipment, will invest in robotic welding technology, develop a prototype cone crusher chamber and install a new automated paint line system. Partnering with local businesses is a key component of the Ontario government's plan to create and support new and existing jobs and to strengthen local economies.

    "This is one example of Ontario's investment in home-grown companies," said Brad Duguid, Minister of Economic Development and Innovation. "McCloskey is developing new products and replacing imported components with made-in-Ontario parts. This is the kind of growth we want to see in local manufacturing."

    QUICK FACTS

    • Previous support from the province in 2009 helped McCloskey created 80 new jobs - 30 more than the company's original job creation commitment - and helped the company build infrastructure, purchase equipment and expand production.

    • Founded in 1985, McCloskey International Limited manufactures portable conveyors and screening equipment for use in the aggregate, landscaping and recycling sectors.
    • Since October 2003, Ontario has created 524,100 net new jobs.

    • In 2010, Ontario was named a top destination for foreign direct investment in North America, second only to California. The province attracted a total of 127 Foreign Direct Investment projects, which created more than 11,200 jobs.

    • Ontario's corporate income tax rates are internationally competitive. Ontario's combined general federal-provincial corporate income tax rate of 26.5 per cent is lower than the average of G8 and G20 countries and lower than the average federal–state CIT rate in the United States.


  • New Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute in Ontario, Canada Attracts Healthcare Talent from Around the World

    Hong Kong entrepreneur and philanthropist Li Ka-shing was on hand for the opening of the new Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Ontario. The Li Ka Shing (Canada) Foundation donated $25 million to the institute, which employs 575 researchers and educators.

    Comprised of the Keenan Research Centre and the Li Ka Shing International Healthcare Education Centre, the new facility will house classrooms, offices, lab benching, lounges, a library, simulation centre, a 200-seat auditorium. Teams of leading researchers will be focused on key areas of research:

    • organ injury/critical care (including brain injury and trauma, lung injury, cardiovascular, diabetes and kidney, blood and others),

    • inner city health (including homelessness, mental illness, HIV/AIDS and others),

    • global health (including large scale epidemiology, international health ethics, tuberculosis and others), and

    • knowledge translation (the science of translating relevant research to practice, with a focus on chronic disease management, public engagement and leveraging research, education and clinical care).

    The research will improve care and make health care systems around the world more efficient. Additionally, as a centre of excellence with connections to leading edge researchers in the Pacific Rim, the U.S. and Europe, these partnerships will attract the best and brightest while fostering a global network of exchange between Canada and the international community.

    The Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute
    The Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute
    The Canadian Press Images

    Ontario already has one of North America's highest concentrations of research talent and facilities, with top-ranked scientists working in virtually every field. The province spends more than $13.9 billion on R&D every year. Ontario has more than 100,000 people engaged directly in R&D.

    Within the life sciences sector alone, 10,000 scientists, clinical investigators and other researchers at 25 research and academic hospitals conduct $850 million in research annually. Bringing together all these public and private-sector researchers are collaborative networks and organizations that help new ideas converge.

    "We are very grateful to Mr. Li and the provincial government, as well as our other donors, for their financial contributions to this building. Their help allowed us to design a world-class building that allows researchers, educators and clinicians to work in close proximity to create new possibilities that will improve patient care," said Dr. Robert J. Howard, President and CEO of St. Michael's Hospital.

    This concentration of talent and facilities helps our innovative companies meet the challenges and leverage the opportunities of global markets.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Hong Kong entrepreneur Li Ka-shing donated $25 million to the institute that bears his name.

    • Construction of the building took four years.

    • The Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute is linked by a pedestrian bridge to St. Michael's Hospital, which broadens the network to include the hospital's clinicians.

    • The institute trains approximately 3,000 new health professionals every year.

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  • Ontario, Canada Company Creates App Breakthrough That Saves Time and Money

    An Ontario, Canada-based IT firm is revolutionizing the way that companies build apps. Weever Apps Inc. has developed a web-based plug-in that can greatly reduce the cost and time customarily needed to make mobile apps.

    The idea came from a desire to give more organizations a chance to make use of this way of communicating. The new technology will be especially useful for smaller businesses and not-for-profits that may find the customary costs of mobile app development too expensive.

    Computer programmers and web designers Andrew Holden and Rob Porter started a web design company in Hamilton, Ontario in 2010. In the course of their web design work, they noted that it was difficult if not impossible for many of their clients to afford to build apps. Companies use apps to provide clients with highly tailored, customized mobile experiences. They are increasingly used by firms but they are often expensive and time consuming to make. Companies can get quotes for as high as $25,000 to $100,000 from programming firms.

    The Weever Apps Inc. team
    The Weever Apps Inc. team

    The realization inspired Holden and Porter's big idea: a web-based plug in, called Weever Apps, which would allow users to build their own apps at a fraction of the cost of hiring a programmer. Weever also dramatically cuts the time it takes to build apps and, because it's web-based, it works on a wide variety of already available platforms, devices and browsers. The new service turns almost any site into a true "web app" instantly and affordably. The company soon realized that its client base had extended to large enterprises drawn by the service's cross platform capability and unique optional features.

    Holden says that they've gotten tremendous support from the city of Hamilton. They have also received support from the Innovation Factory (iF), a not-for-profit Regional Innovation Centre (RIC) at McMaster Innovation Park. iF helps entrepreneurs commercialize, and it is networked across North America and committed to building Ontario’s innovation community. iF is funded by the Ontario Network of Excellence (ONE), which is focused on strengthening the next generation of wealth and jobs generators. Since its launch Weever Apps has garnered impressive industry and media attention. It also won the grand prize at the Lion's Lair, a celebration of entrepreneurship in Hamilton, Ontario during which aspiring entrepreneurs and innovators face a panel of Hamilton’s top business executives and solicit up to $100,000 to get their companies off the ground.

    Tim Richard, Weever Apps' V.P. of Operations says that thanks to Ontario's generous R&D tax credits, Weever Apps has been able to hire graduates from nearby McMaster University and Mohawk College. The new hires add to the firm's developer compliment.

    Tim adds, “the advantage of working in Ontario is the high calibre of IT talent, low taxes, proximity to enterprise and corporate head offices.”

    Ontario ICT companies are leading the world to new frontiers, thanks to innovative minds and world-class research facilities. The province's industry is recognized globally for its expertise in every sector, including software and systems, wireless and telecommunications, microelectronics, photonics, digital media and green IT.

    Ontario offers everything leading ICT companies need to succeed: a smart, skilled workforce, outstanding researchers and research facilities, exceptional R&D tax credits, the lowest business costs in the G7 and an enviable quality of life that is needed to attract top talent. Ontario also has a government that's making ICT research and commercialization a priority.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Ontario's ICT industry includes more than 16,000 innovative companies that generate annual revenues of $75 billion+.

    • Thousands of researchers at Ontario universities and colleges work in every area of ICT, including photonics, bioinformatics, 3D imaging, broadband/satellite/mobile/wireless communications and next generation e-devices.

    • Scientific Research and Experimental Development (SR&ED) Tax Incentive Program is a federal tax incentive program that encourages Canadian businesses of all sizes, and in all sectors to conduct research and development (R&D) in Canada. Ontario tops up the SR&ED tax program with additional tax incentives such as the Ontario Research and Development Tax Credit (ORDTC), the Ontario Innovation Tax Credit (OITC) and the Ontario Business-Research Institute (OBRI) tax credit.

    • Organizations such as the Centre of Excellence for Communications and Information Technology, the Canadian Microelectronics Corporation and MaRS facilitate technology transfers and multi-party ICT partnerships.

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  • Forbes Magazine Ranks Canada the World's Best Place to Do Business

    Forbes magazine ranks Canada #1 in its recently released list of "Best Countries for Business". The ranking is based on a range of metrics such as tax burden, investor protection, trade and monetary freedom, innovation, and red tape and corruption. Canada was the only country that ranked in the top 20 in 10 of the 11 metrics used to create the rankings.

    Canada leads business globally, and Ontario is Canada's hub for global business. Ontario is home to 58% of all foreign-controlled Canadian head offices operating in Canada. World leading companies in the automotive industry, life sciences, telecommunications and financial services have invested billions to start or expand their operations in Ontario.

    Forbes lauds Canada's tax policies, especially, as a key factor of the country's success: "Credit a reformed tax structure with a Harmonized Sales Tax introduced in Ontario and British Columbia in 2010. The goal is to make Canadian businesses more competitive. Canada's tax status also improved thanks to reduced corporate and employee tax rates."

    Ontario, Canada, is the pillar of Canada's economy. Ontario generates more than 38 per cent of Canada's total GDP. Ontario's corporate income tax rates are internationally competitive. Ontario's combined general federal-provincial corporate income tax rate of 26.5 per cent is lower than the average of G8 and G20 countries and lower than the average federal–state CIT rate in the United States.

    The influential magazine cites Canada's relative stability during the global recession, singling out Canada's globally renowned banking centre, which, "emerged from the financial crisis of 2008-09 among the strongest in the world, owing to [it]'s tradition of conservative lending practices and strong capitalization."

    "Canada's economy has held up better than most," states Forbes. "The $1.6 trillion economy is the ninth biggest in the world and grew 3.1% last year. It is expected to expand 2.4% in 2011, according to the Royal Bank of Canada."

    "As an affluent, high-tech industrial society in the trillion-dollar class," Forbes states, "Canada resembles the US in its market-oriented economic system, pattern of production, and affluent living standards."

    QUICK FACTS

    • Ontario's GDP, at more than US$504 billion, is larger than that of Switzerland, Belgium, Austria or any of the Scandinavian countries.

    • According to a report released by the Financial Times' fDi Intelligence think-tank in spring 2011, Ontario ranked second in North America as a destination for foreign direct investment (FDI) projects. Relative to population, Ontario emerges as the top North American jurisdiction for FDI projects in 2010 with 10 projects per million of population, followed by South Carolina with nine projects per million.

    • The Geneva-based, non-profit World Economic Forum found that Canada has the world's soundest banking system for the fifth year in a row in its influential Global Competitiveness Report 2012-2013. Ontario is the heart of Canada's banking system.

    • The Global Competitiveness Report also gives Canada top rankings for the low number of procedures required to start a business. That means that businesses can start faster in Canada than just about anywhere else.

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  • Grand Opening of the Stephen Hawking Centre at Ontario, Canada-based Perimeter Institute

    The new Stephen Hawking Centre is now open at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics (PI) in Ontario, Canada. The state-of-the-art expansion will help advance scientific progress by providing the ultimate environment for physicists to interact, conceive, visualize, and understand the nature of physical reality, from the subatomic world to the entire universe.

    Ontario is a place where big ideas spark and great things happen. That's why some of the world's greatest thinkers, innovators, and entrepreneurs build one-of-a-kind institutions like the Stephen Hawking Centre at Perimeter Institute here.

    Stephen Hawking Centre at Perimeter Institute
    Stephen Hawking Centre at Perimeter Institute
    Photo by Jens Langen

    Ontario is a global centre for advanced research and innovation and a go-to location for industries and businesses focused on groundbreaking advancements in fields such as physics, IT, life sciences, and advanced materials and nanotechnology.

    The expanded facility will accommodate up to 250 physicists and research trainees, making Ontario's Perimeter Institute the largest centre of its kind in the world devoted to research, training and outreach in theoretical physics. It will include interaction areas for spontaneous, multi-disciplinary research activity, and presentation spaces for seminars and workshops. Also the Centre will feature state-of-the-art IT infrastructure to support scientific visualization and analysis of complex calculations. This will allow researchers to conduct distant, real-time collaborations with colleagues around the world. By adding 55,000 extra square feet the Stephen Hawking Centre doubles the size of the initial research complex to 120,000 square feet.

    The construction of the newly expanded facility is just one in a series of recent, major investments that are increasing Ontario's innovation, research and development capacities. In 2011, Ontario helped the MaRS Discovery District expand to more than double its size, making it the largest urban innovation hub in the world. MaRS is a convergence centre in the heart of Toronto, Ontario's discovery district that brings together researchers, financiers, entrepreneurs and industry leaders to accelerate innovation and the commercialization of new discoveries. Earlier in the year Ciena Canada Inc., a telecommunications equipment company, announced an investment of $900 million dollars in Ontario with the goal of developing new technology and making Ottawa, Ontario the focal point of its global research and development efforts.

    Companies and organizations choose Ontario and grow in Ontario because the province has what it takes to help them grow and succeed.

    Stephen Hawking Centre at Perimeter Institute
    Stephen Hawking Centre at Perimeter Institute
    Photo by Jens Langen

    The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics is an independent scientific research organization working to advance our understanding of physical laws and develop new ideas about the very essence of space, time, matter and information. Located in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada – the heart of Canada's Technology Triangle (more on that, below), the Perimeter Institute also provides a wide array of research training and educational outreach activities to nurture scientific talent and share the importance of discovery and innovation among students, teachers and the general public.

    Funding for the Stephen Hawking Centre at Perimeter Institute was awarded through an internationally peer reviewed infrastructure granting competition and involves a three-way public-private partnership with the Ontario government, the Canadian government, and private donations. The Perimeter Institute is a successful example of public-private collaboration in scientific research, training and outreach.

    Foundational research in theoretical physics has historically led to some of the greatest advances in our fundamental understanding of the universe and matter, including advances in materials sciences such as nanotechnology. These advances hold the promise of transforming virtually every high-tech industry from advanced manufacturing to life sciences, to information technology. Unlocking and harnessing its potential requires four essential elements:

    1. Great and ambitious science.
    2. World-class research infrastructure.
    3. Skilled workers.
    4. And supportive government.

    Ontario has all of that – in a positive investment climate.

    Highly sophisticated, world-leading research is at the core of our ability to explore and expand on the power of nanotechnology, and Ontario is recognized worldwide for the quality of its scientific minds.

    • We have hundreds of bright scientists at research centres across the province engaged in nanotechnology - many of them involved in it before it was even identified as a science.

    • We're attracting top-notch researchers from around the world, drawn by our reputation for excellent science, a collaborative and intellectually challenging research environment and generous funding.

    QUICK FACTS

    Some Facts on Canada's Technology Triangle Inc and the Perimeter Institute

    Canada's Technology Triangle Inc.

    • Canada's Technology Triangle (Waterloo Region; also abbreviated "CTT") derived its name from the longstanding reputation the region has for innovation, established by resident businesses. Canada's Technology Triangle came to be used in the 1980s and the global recognition of its high technology cluster in the 1990s validated the name.

    • CTT Inc is the not-for-profit, public-private regional economic development partnership marketing the Waterloo Region of Ontario including the cities of Cambridge, Kitchener and Waterloo. Its mandate is to attract new businesses, investment, and talent while promoting regional economic growth.

    • CTT has become the "go-to" organization for businesses looking for a new location.

    • It works in partnership with all municipal economic development agencies of the three cities.

    • CTT specializes in external marketing building on the region's strengths and by promoting the area's universities and colleges that provide an available talent pool for employers. It advances opportunities for technological/manufacturing convergence and cost-competitiveness, based on solid research and trends analysis.

    • Companies in the region include RIM (BlackBerry), OpenText, DALSA, COM DEV, Christie (digital projection) and Toyota's first, outside-Japan, luxury class car production.

    Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

    • Located in Waterloo Region, the Institute was created in 1999 through a personal donation of $100 million from Mike Lazaridis, Co-CEO of RIM. He has since contributed an additional $70 million and, over the last 10 years, all levels of government and other private partners have also invested.

    • The Perimeter Institute is an independent, non-profit, scientific research organization where international scientists cluster to push the limits of human understanding of physical laws and develop new ideas about the very essence of space, time, matter and information.

    • The research builds upon two great 20th century advances involving Einstein's theory of general relativity describing physics on the largest observable scales of stars, galaxies and the universe itself, and quantum theory which describes the behaviour of matter and energy on the smallest scales in the atomic and subatomic worlds where fundamental particles move and interact with each other.

    • Investigations into foundational areas can be transformative and, ultimately, provide the fundamental knowledge necessary to advancing society with all manner of new technologies.

    • The Perimeter Institute is home to over 100 resident researchers and hosts a visitor program that attracts hundreds of other leading scientists from around the world each year.

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  • Ontario Ranks as the Most Competitive Province in Canada

    Ontario, Canada's profile is once again on the rise in the world of international business and investment. Each day, more global business leaders are discovering that Ontario's exceptional dynamism and stability are a powerful combination that's resulting in business success.

    Now Site Selection magazine has confirmed it. Ontario was ranked Canada's most competitive province in a recently released annual review of best places for investment and business development. In addition, Ontario garnered top rankings for the efficacy of its regional economic development groups; and four Ontario municipalities: Toronto, Hamilton, Windsor and London, are ranked among the leading Canadian metro areas in corporate facility development.

    "What continues to distinguish Canada as a whole and successful Canadian communities in particular are openness to global firms and global talent, and an increasingly friendly operating environment for industry," says Adam Bruns, managing editor of Site Selection.

    This recognition is on top of other recent high-profile findings. According to a report released in spring 2011 by the Financial Times' fDi Intelligence think-tank, Ontario emerged as the top North American jurisdiction for FDI projects relative to population in 2010. Then, in June 2011, Toronto, Ontario, Canada leapt into the number two spot in the world in a PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) survey of "Cities of Opportunity".

    The Site Selection findings are included in its fourth annual Canada Best to Invest awards and rankings, based on June 2010-May 2011 project data and the magazine's own research. Site Selection is a leading publication focused on site selection and expansion planning for international firms.

    Site Selection's "Top Canadian Groups" category recognizes local economic development groups based on project data, regional partnership, proactive and innovative programming, and quality data and Web tools and resources. Half of the top ten economic development groups ranked in the Canadian Groups category are in Ontario:

    • Canada's Technology Triangle (a not-for-profit, public-private regional economic development partnership that markets the competitive advantages of the Waterloo Region to the world)

    • City of Hamilton – Economic Development & Real Estate Division

    • London Economic Development Corp.

    • City of Mississauga Economic Development Office

    • Windsor Essex Economic Development Corp.

    LEARN MORE



  • Ontario, Canada Invests in Clean Tech Sector – Helps Launch World's First Commercial Biosuccinic Acid Plant

    Ontario, Canada is helping Bluewater Biochemicals Inc. to establish the world's first commercial biosuccinic acid plant in Sarnia.

    With support from the province, Bluewater Biochemicals will produce clean biochemicals to replace more costly chemicals and petrochemicals that are used in a variety of industries, including automotive parts, road and runway de-icers, consumer packaging, and cosmetics. Bluewater Biochemicals Inc. is a subsidiary of U.S.-based BioAmber Inc.

    Biochemicals and biosuccinic are far better than traditional types of chemicals, as they cost less to make, have a much lower impact on the environment, and are sustainable. 

    Jean-Francois Huc, President, BioAmber Inc., said, "Ontario's support of bioindustries and renewable energy motivated our decision to set up our biosuccinic acid production plant in Sarnia, not to mention the fact that Sarnia is a hub for the chemical industry in Ontario. We are thankful to Ontario for its contribution."

    "Developing and marketing innovative, clean technologies that reduce our carbon footprint is one of Ontario's strengths and a testimony of our growing impact in the global marketplace," said Sandra Pupatello, Minister of Economic Development and Trade. "Sarnia's new Bluewater Biochemicals plant will help move Ontario's clean technology agenda forward."

    QUICK FACTS

    • Bluewater Biochemicals Inc. is a subsidiary of U.S.-based BioAmber Inc., which will build, own, and operate the biosuccinic acid plant in Sarnia.

    • The market for succinic acid could potentially exceed $1 billion a year by 2015.

    • Biosuccinic acid is made from the fermentation of renewable feed stocks. It consumes significant amounts of CO2 in the production process, which helps clean up our air.

    • Ontario's corporate income tax rates are internationally competitive. Ontario's combined general federal-provincial corporate income tax rate of 26.5 per cent is lower than the average of G8 and G20 countries and lower than the average federal–state CIT rate in the United States.

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  • Ontario, Canada Plugs into Clean Cars, Helps Magna Develop Next Generation of Electric Vehicle Technologies

    Ontario, Canada is helping Magna International and Magna E-Car develop the next generation of clean vehicle technologies at Magna's Aurora, Brampton, Concord and St. Thomas plants.

    "We are delighted to receive support from Ontario to pursue our goal of transitioning Canada's automotive design, engineering and manufacturing toward the clean economy," said Don Walker, CEO, Magna International. "Our plan aligns with Ontario's Auto Strategy, by supporting increased R&D and innovation, developing fuel efficient vehicles and technologies, and a pool of skilled auto professionals."

    With the government's support, the company is launching a number of new projects including:

    • electric car concept development;
    • parts for hybrid electric/battery electric vehicles;
    • advanced lightweight metallic components;
    • an alternate energy project; and,
    • advanced bio-based composite materials to reduce vehicle weight and improve fuel efficiency.

    "Ontario has always been the province that leads by determining where we need to be and working to make that happen," said Sandra Pupatello, Minister of Economic Development and Trade. "Our government's investment in Magna International and Magna E-Car is one way we are making the future happen now."

    QUICK FACTS

    • Magna International, based in Aurora, Ontario, is the largest automotive supplier in North America and a top five global supplier.

    • Magna is Ontario's leader in automotive R&D and employs 17,900 Ontarians in 44 plants across the province.

    • Ontario's vision is to have one out of 20 cars in Ontario electrically powered by 2020. The province has kick-started the widespread availability of electric car charging stations.

    • Ontario residents can receive between $5,000 to $8,500 for purchasing an electric vehicle and can also get "green license plates," which allow drivers to use the province's network of HOV lanes.

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  • Ontario, Canada Supports Cutting-Edge Aerospace Company

    Ontario is helping Magellan Aerospace — a leading Canadian manufacturer of aerospace systems and components — expand its advanced machining operations.

    With the province's support, Magellan is upgrading and enhancing its Kitchener and Mississauga, Ontario facilities to develop the next generation of aerospace products. The new equipment will help the company be more competitive in the global market and enable them to manufacture critical, precision components for aircraft.

    "Magellan takes pride in being one of Canada's leading manufacturers of aerospace components," said D. Scott McCrady, JSF Program Director, Magellan Aerospace. "Magellan's Ontario facilities are playing a key role in the development of manufacturing technologies to produce advanced aerospace components for next-generation aircraft."

    "Partnering with our aerospace companies will help them remain at the cutting-edge as a result of the investments they bring to the table," said Sandra Pupatello, Minister of Economic Development and Trade. "This will ensure these companies remain a fixture in the province supporting tens of thousands of direct and indirect jobs."

    Ontario works to help businesses across industries — including aerospace — grow. For example, following a comprehensive initiative begun in 2009, Ontario's general corporate income tax (CIT) rate has fallen from 14 per cent in 2009 to 11.5 per cent.

    With a total combined provincial and federal (15 per cent) corporate income tax rate of 26.5 per cent, Ontario's combined general federal-provincial CIT rate is lower than the average of G8 and G20 countries and lower than the average federal-state CIT rate in the United States.

    In Ontario, aerospace firms operate in a creative, top-ranked business environment that includes some of the world's most advanced manufacturers in the automotive, telecommunications and life science sector. Ontario has the people, the know-how and the business environment that makes aero innovation profitable.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Magellan's Kitchener facility will produce aluminum and titanium structural components for aircraft. Magellan's Mississauga facility will manufacture engine components.

    • Ontario's aerospace and defence industry employs around 22,000 people with annual sales of approximately $6.5-billion.

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  • Cisco Grows its Global R&D Facilities in Ontario, Canada

    Ontario, Canada and Cisco Canada have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that will enhance technology and R&D collaboration between the company and the province. Ultimately, the benefits of the partnership will strengthen Ontario's position as one of the most innovative jurisdictions in the world for technology R&D and production.

    Cisco Canada
    Cisco Canada President Nitin Kawale; Ontario Minister of Economic Development and Trade Sandra Pupatello; and Cisco Chairman and CEO John Chambers.

    With provincial support, Cisco will invest in major R&D projects that will create 300 new research and development jobs in Toronto, increase research and development work in the province, and help both businesses and government increase productivity through technology.

    "Cisco and the Province of Ontario share a long and successful history," said Nitin Kawale, President, Cisco Canada. "This MOU, only the third of its kind in Ontario's history, is a next stage in our collaborative relationship focused on a shared vision of deploying transformational technology to help achieve sustainable and innovative goals. There is enormous potential to build a solid R&D spring board in Ontario. Cisco is unique in our ability to draw upon the expertise, technology innovation and global best practices to further drive Ontario's dynamic innovation engine."

    The provincial support will help Cisco to expand its R&D projects to:

    • Further advance internet routing
    • Create next-generation technology for the mobile Internet
    • Develop new technology for the future of broadband Internet
    • Create new ways to share online video.

    "Cisco is among the many global technology leaders who continue to recognize Ontario's innovation and the talent of our highly skilled workforce," said Sandra Pupatello, Minister of Economic Development and Trade. "Cisco already conducts R&D in the province critical to their success, and this investment and the MOU are a vital part of our economic strategy."

    QUICK FACTS

    • Cisco's Ontario operations employ about 900 people and comprise its Canadian corporate headquarters and two R&D facilities in Toronto, plus a sales office and R&D facility in Ottawa.

    • In 2010, the information and communications technology sector employed about 272,000 people in Ontario, almost half of the Canadian total.

    • In 2010, Ontario was named a top destination for foreign direct investment in North America, second only to California. The province attracted a total of 127 Foreign Direct Investment projects, which created more than 11,200 jobs.

    • Ontario's corporate income tax rates are internationally competitive. Ontario's combined general federal-provincial corporate income tax rate of 26.5 per cent is lower than the average of G8 and G20 countries and lower than the average federal–state CIT rate in the United States.

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  • Life Sciences Leader Growing In Ontario, Canada

    Ontario, Canada is helping Roche Canada expand its Mississauga facility by making it the home of a new Global Pharmaceutical Development site. This will create 200 new specialized research jobs in the region.

    Roche Canada was selected as a global development site, in part, because Ontario offers the environment necessary to support drug discovery and development, including an educated and capable workforce, and a favourable business environment supported by a government that places a high strategic priority on life sciences.

    "Bringing a Global Pharmaceutical Development site to Roche Canada is a testament to our skilled and talented workforce," said Ronnie Miller, President and CEO, Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. (Roche Canada), "And offers tremendous opportunities to solidify Ontario's reputation as a global research hub."

    Minister Pupatello joins the Roche Canada team
    Minister Pupatello joins the Roche Canada team announcing the company's facility expansion in Mississauga on August 16, 2011.

    The expansion project will provide better healthcare by supporting research, which will lead to new medicines and clinical trials. The project will also create more opportunities for R&D partnerships with Ontario's research and teaching hospitals, universities and other research institutions.

    Sandra Pupatello, Minister of Economic Development and Trade, stated that, "From the discovery of insulin to the development of 3D medical imaging technologies, Ontario has a proven track record in the development of new medicines and health technologies. We're proud to support Roche's latest investment, helping to bring a global pharmaceutical development mandate to Mississauga and creating new jobs for Ontario families."

    The announcement is a testament to Ontario's international leadership in life sciences and biopharmaceuticals, and a result of the expertise Roche Canada has developed.

    QUICK FACTS

    • With this expansion, Roche will have more than 650 employees in Ontario.

    • About 41,500 people work in Ontario's life sciences industry.

    • In 2010, Ontario was named a top destination for foreign direct investment in North America, second only to California. The province attracted a total of 127 Foreign Direct Investment projects which created more than 11,200 jobs.

    • Ontario's corporate income tax rates are internationally competitive. Ontario's combined general federal-provincial corporate income tax rate of 26.5 per cent is lower than the average of G8 and G20 countries and lower than the average federal–state CIT rate in the United States.

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  • Ontario, Canada Invests in Clean Tech Innovation

    Ontario, Canada is helping Biorem – a leading clean tech company – build and demonstrate a new made-in-Ontario technology that will cut industrial pollution.

    The company will build an industrial-scale air treatment system at Polycon Industries in Guelph. Biorem's new high-efficiency biological-based air emissions control system eliminates volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which are harmful to the environment. Biorem's technology will be installed in the automated paint facility at Polycon, a body part manufacturing and paint division of Magna International.

    Biorem Logo

    The new technology will eliminate the harmful emissions produced in this process in a more environmentally friendly way. Plus, the installation will serve as a demonstration plant for Biorem's emissions control system.

    "This is a cleaner, greener technology. It removes pollutants, reduces energy use and greenhouse gases and is mutually beneficial to all partners," said Peter Bruijns, President and CEO of Biorem.

    The system combines biological technology with activated re-generable carbon to yield a removal rate equivalent and higher to thermal oxidizers already in place, but in a more cost effective way.

    Once this demonstration plant has proven itself with a major international company like Magna's Polycon, it will generate more interest from other major manufacturing industries around the world, says Biorem's Vice President of Research & Development, Hadi Husain.

    "It's a great new technology that will eliminate emissions (VOCs) and is beneficial. Because of our relationship with Biorem, we get the first benefits of using this technology," said David Gray, General Manager, Polycon Industries

    Biorem's flagship municipal odour eliminating technology originated in 1991, coming out of research from the University of Waterloo. Over the last few years, Biorem has diversified its technology to widen its market potential.

    "Because of the Innovation Demonstration Fund (IDF) investment, we've been able to install this demonstration facility. Without this investment, it would have been extremely difficult for us to diversify," says Husain. "In terms of market potential, we're aiming at auto part manufacturers, chemical plants, fibre glass producers, any place around the world with chemical solvents and emissions."

    The technology's potential is enormous, which is why Ontario is investing in Biorem and helping to build the bio-economy in Guelph.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Ontario is investing $1.2 million in Biorem through the Innovation Demonstration Fund.

    • Biorem is a leading clean technology company that designs, supplies and distributes a comprehensive line of high-efficiency biological-based air emissions control systems.

    • Biorem estimates that the global market for its technology is more than $1.6 billion annually.

    • Ontario supports over 2,800 environmental industry companies that generate approximately $7 billion in revenue and employ over 65,000 people.

    • In 2010, Ontario attracted a total of 127 Foreign Direct Investment projects worth an estimated $6.1 billion (US) capital investment and the creation of more than 11,200 jobs.

    • In April, Ontario had an increase of 56,000 jobs and the unemployment rate declined to 7.9%.

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  • Ontario, Canada Seeds Investment and Development of Electric Car-Charging Stations

    Ontario, Canada announced an $80-million fund to kick-start the widespread availability of electric car charging stations to make it more convenient for families to choose electric cars.

    Ontario will encourage public and private sectors to come forward with proposals to build, test and expand the availability of recharging facilities. The province will provide seed money to the projects chosen.

    The investment follows the recent announcement that Toyota Motor Manufacturing Canada plans to start assembling electric versions of its RAV4 sport utility vehicle in Woodstock, Ontario under a partnership with California-based Tesla Motors. The RAV4 EV will be the first electric vehicle built in Canada.

    The goal is to ensure that charging stations are conveniently located in order to get more electric cars on the road. Ontario already offers drivers incentives to purchase electric cars -- including an incentive of $5,000 to $8,500 and "green license plates," which allow drivers to use the province's network of high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes.

    "We're taking the next step to ensure car-charging stations are in the right place to power the next generation of vehicles," said Premier of Ontario, Dalton McGuinty. "Just as we worked hard to become North America's number one producer of cars, we're working hard to become number one in North America when it comes to clean energy. Today's announcement takes us one step closer to our vision."

    Video - Ontario Leading The Way For Electric Cars


    QUICK FACTS

    • This announcement is part of the Ontario government's infrastructure investments of more than $35 billion over the next three years.

    • Places around the world such as China, UK, Denmark, Germany, Israel, US, France, Shanghai, Vancouver, Paris, New York City, British Columbia and Quebec are all investing in the charging stations and infrastructure to support the adoption of electric cars.

    • The province's vision is to have one out of 20 cars in Ontario electrically powered by 2020.

    • Toyota recently announced it chose Woodstock, Ontario as the place to manufacture the RAV4 EV.

    • More cars are built in Ontario than any other state or province in North America.

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  • Ontario, Canada Chosen for New Electric Vehicle Production

    Ontario, Canada took another step today toward the plan to become a world-leading clean energy and manufacturing economy. Toyota Motor Manufacturing Canada announced that the company plans to start assembling electric versions of its RAV4 sport utility vehicle in Woodstock, Ontario under a partnership with California-based Tesla Motors. The RAV4 EV will be the first electric vehicle built in Canada.

    "Toyota's decision to produce the RAV4 EV in Woodstock is one more positive result of our investment in green technology," said Sandra Pupatello, Minister of Economic Development and Trade. "Ontario will benefit by taking a leading role in the production of the next generation of green vehicles."

    The Province of Ontario, in partnership with the Government of Canada, will support the production of the RAV4 EV through their investment in Toyota's recently announced Project Green Light. The total investment among all partners could reach $545 million, with Ontario and the Government of Canada each providing $70.8 million towards Project Green Light.

    "We're turning a new chapter in our history and into the future. TMMC will lead the way by building the new RAV4 EV," said Ray Tanguay, Chairman of Toyota Motor Manufacturing Canada. "Being involved with leading edge technology is a great opportunity to motivate and develop our people. This is an excellent example of Toyota's determination to collaborate with companies with innovative technology."

    QUICK FACTS

    • Ontario and the Government of Canada are each providing $70.8 million towards Project Green Light. The total investment from all partners in could reach $545 million.

    • The auto industry supports approximately 400,000 jobs across the Ontario.

    • Ontario builds more cars than any other state or province in North America.

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